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Smarter Comparisons ELA

Charts courtesy of Education Reform Now

Delaware’s Rankings by Grade Levels in ELA  Among Smarter Balanced States

Grade 3:  2nd (Tied with Connecticut)

Grade 4: 4th

Grade 5:  5th

Grade 6:  7th

Grade 7: 7th

Grade 8: 7th

Grade 11: 7th

Smarter Comparison Math

And in math:

Grade 3:  2nd

Grade 4:  3rd

Grade 5:  5th (tied with I da ho)

Grade 6:  8th

Grade 7:  7th

Grade 8:  7th

Grade 11:  7th

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But before one can jump on Delaware’s poorer showing, one must take into account a very glaring factoid totally ignored by those intent of foisting corporate reforms on public schools….

That is:

Delaware has one of the highest proportion of its students (all the highest quality) in private schools; completely outside of public education….

Private enrollment

Map and Charts Courtesy of The Atlantic CityLab.com

Over 15% of all our state’s children are taught in our private schools.  That has to suck a lot of cream off the top of  overall test scores…. Kids whose parents have a college or graduate degree are much more likely to go to private school. Their lack of impact in the public school system, should hit Delaware hard when comparing scores across states.

Particularly when Greater Wilmington Metro Area

Wilmington Private Enrollment

…. is ranked 6th in the nation for highest private school enrollment and we have one zip code, 19807 =  Greenville.………..

Private enrollment by zip

…. fourth highest in the nation at a whopping 78%..….

I’ll do the calculations at another time but with math we can begin to predict based on some assumptions, where if we had fewer of our best in private schools how that would stack our state up against other states.

Bottom line:  if you trim a tree at its first branch, it will not be as tall as those allowed to grow naturally….

A common sense explanation for Delaware’s low scores.  (And none of these private schoolers have to undergo Common Core)  None.

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Why do we not have a bill put forward right now that excises the Smarter Balanced Assessment out from our state education policy?

The following states do have bills working in their state legislatures which would return parts of their educational curriculums back to before Common Core

Courtesy of Huffington Post: 50 State Look at Common Core    ___

ALABAMA

The state school board folded Common Core into the state’s College and Career Ready Standards for public schools and has been defending the decision ever since.

Legislators introduced bills in 2013 and 2014 to repeal the standards. The repeal movement drew support from tea party groups, but Senate President Pro Tem Del Marsh, a Republican, blocked the bills with the support of one of the state’s most powerful business groups, the Business Council of Alabama.

By Phillip Rawls.

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ALASKA

The state did not adopt Common Core, although several Alaska school districts did. Deputy Education Commissioner Les Morse said those districts will be held accountable for ensuring that student learning is in line with the state standards in English, language arts and reading that were adopted in 2012. The state standards have some similarities with Common Core.

By Becky Bohrer.

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ARIZONA

Republican Gov. Jan Brewer has tried to defuse criticism about the Common Core standards by issuing an executive order renaming them as “Arizona’s College and Career Ready Standards,” and reaffirming that Arizona is acting independently from the federal government.

A legislative effort to kill the standards failed this spring.

By Bob Christie.

___

ARKANSAS

The Arkansas Board of Education adopted the Common Core standards in 2010, with an effective date of this fall. The Legislature endorsed the board’s decision during its 2011 regular session.

A few teachers, parents and national groups asked legislators last year to repeal the standards, and a state lawmaker this year attempted to bring up a bill to delay their imposition for three years. Neither effort gained traction.

By Kelly P. Kissel.

___

CALIFORNIA

Most California schools are expected to begin basing instruction on the Common Core standards during the coming school year. Gov. Jerry Brown and the Democrat-controlled Legislature have allocated more than $1.2 billion, about $200 per student, for school districts to spend on teacher training, materials and technology over two years.

California is part of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium that is developing online tests in math and language based on the Common Core. The state has resisted the department’s call for teacher evaluations to be based in part on standardized test results.

By Lisa Leff.

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COLORADO

As in many states, the Common Core standards have prompted opposition in Colorado from some conservatives.

The Democratic-controlled Legislature rejected a proposal that would have ordered a yearlong delay for new statewide tests while the standards were reviewed. Colorado is part of a multistate testing consortium, Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, and students are set to take the PARCC test this school year.

By Kristen Wyatt.

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CONNECTICUT

In June, Democratic Gov. Dannel P. Malloy committed spending an additional $15 million to continue launching Common Core in the state’s public schools. That includes $10 million in borrowing for new school technology, one of the recommendations of a task force created by Malloy in March after teachers and education professionals raised concerns about whether schools were prepared for incorporating the new standards.

While some of Connecticut’s public school districts have begun using the new Common Core standards, others have lagged behind. The issue has become a political one for Malloy, who faces re-election. Both his Republican challenger and a potential petitioning candidate have criticized the rollout of Common Core.

By Susan Haigh.

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DELAWARE

The state is moving forward as Democratic Gov. Jack Markell, a former co-chairman of the Common Core standards initiative, works to dispel notions that they are a federal initiative aimed at the states.

In the spring, students in grades three to eight, and 11th grade will take the new Smarter Balanced assessments in English and mathematics that are tied to Common Core. State education officials have agreed to a one-year delay, subject to federal approval, in using the test results in teacher evaluations. The delay takes into account concerns of the Delaware State Education Association, the teachers’ union.

By Randall Chase.

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DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

District of Columbia public schools began implementing the standards voluntarily in 2010. School leaders are making one major concession: Teachers won’t be evaluated based on their students’ performance on new, Common Core-aligned standardized tests this school year.

That decision made news because the district has moved aggressively to align teacher evaluations with student test scores. The Education Department was initially critical of the policy change, saying it represented a slowdown of the District’s school-reform efforts. Hundreds of District teachers have been fired after receiving poor evaluations, while the top performers have received bonuses.

By Ben Nuckols.

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FLORIDA

Florida officials tweaked the standards among a growing backlash. Beginning the fall, the “Florida standards” will be used in state classrooms.

While some have asked GOP Gov. Rick Scott and legislators to jettison the standards, high-ranking Republicans have tried to tamp down the controversy in other ways.

For example, legislators passed a measure that repealed more than 30 mentions of Common Core that were placed into state law just a year ago. Scott initially backed Common Core standards. But after complaints from grassroots conservative groups and activists, he called for public hearings and set the groundwork for the state to pull out of a consortium developing a national test to see if school children are meeting the new standards.

By Gary Fineout

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GEORGIA

Some Republican lawmakers have pushed bills for two years opting out of Common Core, which are supported by Republican Gov. Nathan Deal, backed by the Georgia Chamber of Commerce and former Gov. Sonny Perdue who co-chaired the governors group that created the standards.

Republicans who control the Legislature compromised by forming a study committee to review the standards’ origins. Georgia dropped out of a national consortium developing tests in line with Common Core in July 2013, saying it was too expensive. The state signed a contract this summer with CTB/McGraw-Hill to develop its own exam that students are scheduled to take during the coming school year.

By Kathleen Foody.

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HAWAII

Hawaii’s Department of Education is asking the public to review test questions aligned to Hawaii Common Core standards and help recommend achievement levels for grade-level proficiency.

Beginning next spring, students will take new Common Core-aligned assessments that will replace the Hawaii State Assessment.

By Jennifer Kelleher.

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IDAHO

There’s been growing opposition to Common Core in Idaho, with calls for reconsideration, even repeal, in the three years since the standards were adopted. But schools are slowly moving forward to put them in place, including the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium exams.

So far, efforts to repeal the standards have failed. As the November election approaches, both the Republican and Democratic candidates for state superintendent have said they will work to improve implementing the standards but have not said they must be repealed.

By Kimberlee Kruesi.

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ILLINOIS

Illinois started to adopt the Common Core standards in 2010, and fully implemented them last school year. Next spring, the PARCC tests linked to Common Core standards will be used in school districts across the state.

The tests will be given to students in grades three to eight, but only partially rolled out in high school because the state board of education had its budget request for assessments cut by $10 million. The ACT exam has been a state mandated assessment for high school juniors in recent years and doubles as a college entrance exam.

By Kerry Lester

___

INDIANA

Indiana formally ended its participation in Common Core this past spring, when Republican Gov. Mike Pence signed a measure pushed by conservative Republicans. But a key change in the legislation, mandating that any Indiana standards qualify for federal funding, spurred the bill’s original author, state Sen. Scott Schneider, a Republican, to withdraw his support.

The state Board of Education approved new education standards in April, a rare moment of agreement between Pence and Democratic Schools Superintendent Glenda Ritz. But the new standards drew criticism from conservatives and tea partyers who said they were too similar to the Common Core requirements.

By Tom Lobianco.

_____

IOWA

Many of the Common Core components have been blended into Iowa’s statewide standards, known as the Iowa Core.

Conservatives in Iowa have attacked the Common Core, but efforts to change the state program have not been successful. But GOP Gov. Terry Branstad last year signed an executive order clarifying that the state would continue to maintain control over education standards and testing, not the federal government.

By Catherine Lucey.

_____

KANSAS

The state Board of Education adopted the Common Core reading and math standards in 2010, but in recent years they have been attacked by conservative Republicans, who say they’re too expensive. Earlier this year, the state Senate attached a provision to an education funding bill that would have blocked their implementation, but it was dropped in the final version of the bill.

The board is moving ahead with developing student tests tied to the standards.

By John Hanna.

___

KENTUCKY

In Kentucky, state lawmakers passed a bill in 2009 that set more rigorous academic standards, new assessments and a new accountability system. Kentucky followed up a year later by adopting Common Core and then in 2013 next-generation science standards. The new standards are known as the Kentucky Core Academic Standards.

Teachers first taught the new English/language arts and math standards in the 2011-12 school year. Students began testing on those new standards that same year.

By Bruce Shreiner.

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LOUISIANA

GOP Gov. Bobby Jindal, a one-time Common Core supporter and a potential presidential candidate in 2016, has sued the Obama administration, accusing Washington of illegally manipulating federal grant money and regulations to force states to adopt the Common Core education standards.

Lawmakers this year rejected several attempts to strip Common Core from classrooms and a majority of the education board voted to continue using the standards.

Jindal suspended contracts that the state Department of Education planned to use to buy testing material aligned with the standards. The education superintendent, John White, and education board leaders say the governor overstepped his legal authority, and they sued.

A state district judge has since said the governor’s actions were harmful to parents, teachers and students and he lifted Jindal’s suspension of the contracts. The decision allows White to move ahead with Common Core-tied testing plans until a full trial is held later over the legality of Jindal’s executive orders against the standards.

At the same time, 17 state lawmakers who oppose the standards have lodged their own legal challenge, but lost their first round in court.

By Melinda Deslatte.

___

MAINE

Two groups opposed to the reading, writing and math benchmarks are trying to collect enough signatures to trigger a statewide vote in 2015 to repeal them.

Maine Education Commissioner James Rier says he spends much of his time fielding calls from people with a misunderstanding of the standards, adopted in 2011 in Maine. The state is now assembling a team of educators and businesspeople to look at updating the standards for math and English language arts, he said. Any changes would have to be approved by the Legislature.

By David Sharp.

___

MARYLAND

Maryland schools began implementing the standards in reading and math two school years ago, and will begin using the PARCC test during the upcoming school year.

In this year’s legislative session, Maryland lawmakers voted by large margins to address some issues that have arisen with Common Core in the state. For example, test scores won’t be used in teacher and principal evaluations for at least the next two years. In addition, a workgroup including teachers and parents will be formed to improve implementation.

By Brian Witte.

___

MASSACHUSETTS

The Board of Elementary and Secondary Education adopted the standards in July 2010, and they became part of the state curriculum the following year. The state is also in the middle of a two-year trial of the PARCC.

The new standards are being challenged by a grassroots group, known as the Common Core Forum, which argues the state’s standards should not be dropped and replaced. The group of parents, teachers and local elected officials has called for repeal of the new standards and more transparency from the state.

By Michael Melia.

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MICHIGAN

In Michigan, the 2014-15 school year was supposed to be the first in which students would take exams developed by the Smarter Balanced consortium. But lawmakers balked, despite last year ultimately letting the state continue spending dollars implementing the standards after vigorous debate.

Legislators later directed the state not to administer the Smarter Balanced test this coming academic year. Instead, it must develop Michigan Educational Assessment Program tests that align with Common Core. The new assessment is to be given starting in the spring of 2016.

By David Eggert.

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MINNESOTA

Minnesota has adopted only the English and language arts standards portions of Common Core but augmented them with more rigorous content developed close to home. The state had already redrawn its math standards.

Rather than joining the national testing groups related to Common Core, Minnesota went with its own assessments.

By Brian Bakst.

_____

MISSISSIPPI

Mississippi schools are supposed to be fully teaching based on the standards this year, and Mississippi plans to use the PARCC tests for most of its state standardized testing beginning this spring.

Attempts were made earlier this year by some lawmakers to roll back the state’s implementation of Common Core, but those proposals failed by wide margins.

But Republican Gov. Phil Bryant has called Common Core a “failed program” and said he expected lawmakers to address the standards in the 2015 legislative session. State Superintendent Carey Wright has pushed back against Bryant, saying his description of Common Core is a “gross mischaracterization” and saying students “deserve the opportunity to perform to higher expectations.”

By Jeff Amy.

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MISSOURI

Public schools in Missouri have transitioned to the standards, but a new state law backed by opponents could get rid of them.

In July, Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon signed a measure passed by the Republican-led Legislature that creates task forces of parents and educators to develop new state standards for English, math, science and history to be implemented during the 2016-2017 school year.

By David Lieb.

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MONTANA

Montana students for the first time will take a test linked to the standards. There was a trial of the test last spring.

Office of Public Instruction Superintendent Denise Juneau said some schools are behind in curriculum development, teacher training and acquiring textbooks or other equipment to teach to the new standards. The 2013 Legislature rejected proposals to allocate money for training and equipment, and state Sen. Roger Webb has submitted a bill request for the 2015 session to bar any funding for the standards.

By Matt Volz.

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NEBRASKA

Nebraska has not adopted the standards, and uses state standards developed by teachers, said Betty VanDeventer, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Education. By law, they’re reviewed once every five years.

A study commissioned by the department last year found that Nebraska’s language arts standards are as tough as those of Common Core and more demanding in some areas. The study said Nebraska’s math standards cover most of the national Common Core content. Some material is introduced in later grades, but the study said it’s often presented in greater depth.

By Grant Schulte.

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NEVADA

Opponents have spoken out against the standards at state school board and interim legislative meetings, and coalesced into a group called Stop Common Core Nevada. Some are working with lawmakers in hopes of introducing a bill next year to repeal the measures.

Meanwhile the Nevada Board of Education now refers to the Common Core name as the Nevada Academic Content Standards, and the state superintendent has launched a communications initiative called Nevada Ready to inform parents and the public about the new standards. The Wynn Family Foundation, funded by casino mogul and state school board president Elaine Wynn, has provided $200,000 to the public relations campaign.

By Michelle Rindels.

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NEW HAMPSHIRE

Local school boards are not required to adopt the Common Core standards, even though they have been endorsed by the state Board of Education. But state assessment tests, which students will begin taking next spring, must be aligned to the standards.

The Legislature defeated several bills this spring aimed at ending or scaling back the state’s involvement in the standards.

By Holly Ramer.

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NEW JERSEY

New Jersey is moving ahead. Beginning with the coming school year, schools will be required to use PARCC tests to measure how well students are learning the curriculum.

The Democrat-dominated Legislature wanted to delay consequences of those tests for at least two years until a review of the standards could be completed. That would have meant that the tests could not have been used as part of teacher evaluations.

In a compromise, Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican, took executive action that said the exams will count for teachers’ grades, but they’ll be given lower weight over the first two years. He also established a commission to review the effectiveness of student testing.

By Geoff Mulvihill

___

NEW MEXICO

Republican Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration has been a strong advocate of the Common Core standards, and students in grade three to 11 will take online tests aligned to the standards for the first time this spring.

The standards have been phased in, and teachers in all grades during the last school year, 2013-2014, were to have integrated Common Core into their classroom curriculum. There has been no push in the Democratic-controlled Legislature to back away from the standards.

By Barry Massey.

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NEW YORK

Dissatisfaction with Common Core and the tests based on them led thousands of New York parents to “opt out” of the 2014 exams, and state lawmakers approved a measure last month that delays the use of the test results in some teacher evaluations.

The Common Core has become an issue in the New York governor’s race. Rob Astorino, the Republican who aims to unseat incumbent Democrat Andrew Cuomo, is seeking to capitalize on opposition to the standards by putting a “Stop Common Core” party on the November ballot. If enough people sign petitions for the party, Democrats and independents who oppose the Common Core could use the ballot line to vote for Astorino without voting Republican.

By Karen Matthews.

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NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory signed legislation in July to rewrite Common Core, creating a commission to come up with new reading and math standards.

Common Core will be in place in the state until the new standards are created and implemented. The commission can choose to integrate parts of the current Common Core into the new standards.

By Katelyn Ferral.

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NORTH DAKOTA

North Dakota adopted Common Core standards in 2011, and began to fully implement them during the 2013-14 school year. Assessments based on the new standards will start for all students next spring.

North Dakota lawmakers have remained mostly silent on the new standards.

By James MacPherson

____

OHIO

Republican lawmakers in the Ohio House are beginning a push to repeal Common Core learning standards by year’s end, citing widespread discontent they say they’re hearing from parents, teachers and communities.

It’s unclear whether the bill could pass. Districts already are well on their way to implementing the standards, which have the backing of a diverse coalition of Ohio groups including teachers’ unions, superintendents, the Urban League and the Ohio Chamber of Commerce.

By Julie Carr Smyth.

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OKLAHOMA

Gov. Mary Fallin, a Republican who strongly supported Common Core as head of the National Governors Association, reversed course this year and signed into law a repeal of the standards.

In response, the federal government on Thursday did not renew the state’s waiver involving stringent requirements in the No Child Left Behind law. The move stripped Oklahoma’s power to decide how to spend $29 million in education dollars. The Obama administration said the state no longer could demonstrate that its school standards were preparing students for college and careers.

Education officials estimate that about 70 percent of Oklahoma’s more than 500 school districts already had integrated the Common Core standards into their textbooks, teaching methods or curriculum. Now, districts are being directed to return to the Priority Academic Student Skills, or PASS standards, that were in place in 2010, until the state develops its own new standards. That process is expected to take up to two years.

By Sean Murphy.

_____

OREGON

Eighty percent of Oregon teachers who responded to a statewide survey this spring said what’s being taught in their school aligns with the skilled required by Common Core.

But there has been grumbling.

Dennis Richardson, the Republican gubernatorial candidate, said he opposes Common Core. Meanwhile, Portland Public Schools, the state’s largest school district, asked the state to delay using Common Core-aligned testing to evaluate teachers, students, school districts and individual schools. State education officials have asked the Education Department to grant a one-year delay in using results from the new, Common Core-aligned assessments as part of a teacher’s evaluation.

By Steven DuBois.

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PENNSYLVANIA

Pennsylvania’s version, known as Pennsylvania Core Standards, took effect in March.

They were developed in part by examining the national Common Core but are not identical. At least one state lawmaker is attempting to get them repealed, and others have spoken out against them.

By Mark Scolforo.

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RHODE ISLAND

The Common Core standards have been in place since the start of the 2013-2014 school year, and students will take the first assessments aligned with them next spring. The state is using the PARCC.

The state’s largest teachers union, National Education Association Rhode Island, has criticized the Common Core standards — including the pace of implementation — and what it considers an overemphasis on standardized tests. During debate over use of another test as a high school graduation requirement, state lawmakers generally expressed support for the standards and the alignment of the curriculum with the PARCC test.

By Erika Niedowski.

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SOUTH CAROLINA

A South Carolina law signed May 30 requires new standards to replace Common Core by the time students walk into classrooms in August 2015. Meanwhile, full implementation of Common Core, to include aligned testing, continues as planned this school year.

Many legislators saw the new law as a way to satisfy the opposition by essentially stepping up a review that would have occurred anyway, expecting little to change. Leaders of the state Board of Education and Education Oversight Committee — the two groups that must approve any changes — said there’s no time to start from scratch.

But Superintendent Mick Zais, a Republican who didn’t seek a second term, insists there is and that there will be no simple editing of Common Core. An agreed-to timeline calls for the new standards to receive final approval in March.

By Seanna Adcox.

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SOUTH DAKOTA

South Dakota began to fully implement the standards during the 2013-2014 school year.

A number of bills seeking to scrap the Common Core standards failed during the 2014 Legislature. Lawmakers, however, approved a bill that would delay the adoption of multistate standards in any other subjects until after July 2016. GOP Gov. Dennis Daugaard signed the bill in March.

By Regina Garcia Cano.

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TENNESSEE

During the last Tennessee General Assembly, lawmakers proposed several measures to do away with the state’s Common Core standards. All of them failed.

But lawmakers voted to delay the testing associated with Common Core for one year. Republican Gov. Bill Haslam reluctantly signed the measure. He said the standards are needed to better prepare students for college and the workforce and play a role in attempt to raise the state’s high school graduation rates from the current 32 percent to 55 percent by the year 2025.

By Lucas L. Johnson II.

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TEXAS

Texas refused to adopt Common Core, instead mandating curriculum standards known as the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, though as much as two-thirds of the state’s math standards are thought to overlap with Common Core requirements.

Conservatives continue to worry about Common Core seeping into Texas classrooms, so much so that the Legislature in 2013 passed a law expressly forbidding school districts from using it as part of lesson plans. Then, in June, Republican Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, the front-runner in November’s governor’s race, issued an opinion reiterating that schools using Common Core standards “in any way” would violate that law.

By Will Weissert.

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UTAH

Gov. Gary Herbert, a Republican, has defended the state’s Common Core standards, which are generally referred to as Utah Core or Utah Core Standards.

But after protests and swelling complaints from conservative activists, Herbert has asked the state attorney general’s office to review the adoption of the standards and to report the level of control Utah and local districts and schools have over curriculum. He also asked education experts to review how well the standards will prepare students for success and established a website where parents and others can leave comments about the standards.

Utah passed a law two years ago that requires the state to abandon any agreements or contracts if Utah’s control of standards or curriculum is ceded to the federal government. Earlier this year, the Legislature passed and Herbert signed a measure creating a standards review committee.

By Michelle Price.

_____

VERMONT

Common Core was introduced to Vermont educators in 2010 and this year schools are expected to have their curriculum fully aligned with the standards.

The agency has heard about pockets of parents who are upset. But Pat Fitzsimmons, the Common Core implementation coordinator for the state’s Agency of Education, says there’s been misinformation. She said some opponents are upset about the Smarter Balanced Assessment, to be given in 2015, and have concerns about technology involved and protecting student data.

By Lisa Rathke.

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VIRGINIA

Virginia refused to participate in the national Common Core system, instead deciding in 2010 to strengthen its own Standards of Learning.

The state introduced new standardized math tests in 2012 and more rigorous reading, writing and science assessments in 2013. The state is reducing the number of standardized exams that middle and elementary school students have to take from 22 to 17.

In addition, state Secretary of Education Anne Holton has appointed a 20-member committee to study the Standards of Learning and make recommendations to the Virginia Board of Education and the General Assembly on ways to improve SOL tests and student growth measures, and encourage innovative teaching.

By John Raby.

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WASHINGTON

Washington state adopted the new Common Core standards for math and English in 2011 and began using them in its public schools the following school year. During the coming school year, tests aligned to the standards will be used instead of the previous state-developed system.

Washington teachers and their union have expressed concern about both the new education standards and the new tests, saying they need more time to get used to the new program before they are judged on how well their students are doing. The Legislature decided not to require test scores to be part of the teachers’ evaluations, resulting in the state’s loss of its waiver from the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind Law.

By Donna Blankinship

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WEST VIRGINIA

In 2010, the West Virginia Board of Education approved Common Core state standards for math and English, customizing the content specifically for the state’s students. More than 100 teachers developed the content standards aimed at giving teachers more focus and flexibility while preparing students to be college and career ready.

The transition must be complete in all grades by this fall, but the state is allowing counties to determine how to adopt the changes.

By John Raby.

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WISCONSIN

Republican Gov. Scott Walker, a potential 2016 presidential candidate facing re-election this year, has called for repeal of the standards, a move opposed by his Democratic opponent in the governor’s race, Mary Burke.

Repeal also is opposed by the nonpartisan state superintendent of schools, who argues changing course now after spending millions of dollars to implement the Common Core the past four years would send Wisconsin schools into chaos. Testing tied to the standards will begin this spring.

By Scott Bauer.

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WYOMING

Some Wyoming school districts have implemented the standards, which were adopted in 2012, but critics have been persistent in speaking out against them.

A bill to repeal the standards in Wyoming failed to get enough votes for consideration in last winter’s legislative session. Under state law, the standards will be up for review again in 2017.

By Bob Moen.

 

There is an ad on WDEL where Greg Lavelle says something about helping children with disabilities.   It is a very nice ad and he should be commended for it.

However, it is ironical.  If there was anyone ever in this history of this state who has done so much to ruin disabled children for the rest of their lives, it is State Senator Greg Lavelle. when he switched his vote from NAY to YEA which allowed the Smarter Balanced Assessment to become the test of all students.

The antics of Penny Marshal, former Secretary Murphy, and Lindsey O’Mara pale in comparison.

It would be the equivalent of dropping the bomb on Japan…

For here is what it did. Here is what the Smarter Balanced Assessment does…. and we have found an awful lot about it since that vote took place….

It changed the “criteria” for teaching disabled children for ever….

Instead of  taking a disabled child and figuring out and then promoting what they CAN do, we are going to great extraordinary lengths to expose all their flaws and document everything in great detail they CAN’T do…

It is a sea change in how we evaluate children… and it flows from allowing the Smarter Balanced test to be used to evaluate our children…

Against infinity no one can win. There will always be new areas to explore where our children are missing something or not getting enough of others.. But lost in that is the idea that children as adults should be able to be self sufficient.

Train them for something they CAN do… We’ve done that in public education for over 100 years now… Until June 26, 2014 at 9:34 pm, when a call for a new vote on a previously defeated bill was passed, and Greg Lavelle switched his vote from NAY to YAY…..

Remember that:  when you hear his ad on helping children with disabilities…

Children should be rewarded for what they can do. not punished for what they can’t…. That goes for all children and opting out of the Smarter Balanced Assessment is the best inoculation against things going bad in your child future, that any parent can now do.

We can find out due to his past cozy relationship with POLITICO,  (Remember it was “his” getting Greg Lavelle on Chuck Todd’s Friday morning show, which made Greg Lavelle become the ONLY republican to switch his vote from “nay” to “yay”…

Here is the horror yet to visit Delaware if our General Assembly does not immediately stand up for parents, students, teachers and every taxpayer in this state.

“Delaware Gov. Jack Markell said Monday that the National Governors Association had a “very constructive conversation” on Common Core challenges and opportunities at its meetings over the weekend — at least behind closed doors. But “there might be a couple [governors] who are feeling real pressure” to scrap, or scale back on, the standards, he said during a visit to POLITICO. He declined to name anyone specifically, but he did say that he wouldn’t be surprised if Common Core votes come up in more states.”  Let’s make one of them Delaware…

Let’s get a bill laid on the table responsibly removing Common Core and the Smarter Balanced Assessments… so the consortium of parents, teachers and taxpayers, can get it out across Social Media and have it in every parent’s hand by tomorrow.

Someone tell me why we are rushing into the Smarter Balanced Assessments again? Oh, yeah, Greg Lavelle. That’s right.

Minding My Matters

Tonight I had the pleasure of attending a well-run presentation by the Delaware State Education Association (DSEA) related to the Delaware Performance Appraisal System, currently in a revised state of its second iteration (DPAS II (r) ), and it got me thinking.

It is no secret that I am a card-carrying, wristband-wearing, federal Department of Education-occupying, National Education Association (independent) caucus member of the BadAss Teachers Association, and have been a member since a few short weeks after its inception. My daughter and I own matching opt-out t-shirts, and I fully plan to send a notification to her school this year stating that she will not be taking the Smarter assessment, formerly known as the Smarter Balanced assessment.

However, I am a firm believer that one may not complain if one does not participate in the process, and furthermore that one may not complain with opinions and anecdotal evidence. “Show…

View original post 679 more words

Little mention was made around here, but the New York debacle in its imposing Common Core and accountability spawned considerable backlash, and two nobody candidates against New York Governor Cuomo, took 40% of the Democratic primary vote.

That would be like Rebecca Walker taking 40% away from Markell… yes   and all because of Common Core.

Democrats should take that lesson to heart.  Stuck in their own little bubbles they seem to have turned a political tin ear to parent’s concerns… Something of which Republicans are beginning to take notice. 

I borrowed this from Peter Greene and tweaked it for local consumption…

Detecting A Bad Boyfriend Is Like Seeing Through Common Core.

Clues:

“…The crying kids. When your boyfriend makes your kids miserable, that’s a sign that he’s toxic. When your educational reform problem sucks the joy of learning out of children,… something is wrong.

The addictions. If bad boyfriend is an alcoholic, you can argue that he’s not the problem—it’s just the alcohol. But the truth is you can’t separate the two. The common core has a bad addiction to high-stakes testing, lesson micro-management, and invalid teacher evaluations. It’s technically true that CCSS and these other reform ideas are separate, but like alcoholism and alcohol, they come as a package.

The lies. If you catch bad boyfriend lying about his job, his age, and his family, all the charm in the world can’t keep you from wondering what else he has lied about. Common-core boosters claimed it was written by teachers, internationally benchmarked, and research based. Turns out none of that is true

The money. Money is not inherently evil. But when it turns out bad boyfriend has been taking money out of your purse, that doesn’t help the romance. Common-core-based reform keeps revealing new ways to suck money out of schools and deliver it to corporate interests.

The blaming. Bad boyfriend is sorry that he yells at you, but you shouldn’t have made it necessary. The common-core narrative asked teachers to see themselves as failures, regardless of what they could see with their own eyes…”

Email you Legislator… Tell him/her to kick that lazy no-good abuser bum of a boyfriend out!

That is taking place right now.  A top secret meeting between the Department of Education and the Supers and Boards of Red Clay and Christina districts in the Carvel building as we type.

John Kowalko is trying to attend despite being told that would be “inappropriate” by a current representative of the Executive Branch.  Kim William is also trying to attend.  I am hoping others will as well.

There are two ways to approach change…

A)  One is the Hitler method, commonly used in corporations where employees have only two choices, to accept the new way of doing things, or give up all financial income until another job is landed.

B)  The other is the method on which this nation was founded.  Bring all parties together, discuss options out in the open, and then vote, and go with the direction of that vote…..

Some people actually like option A.  Others prefer B….

There is no secret that Common Core, and Educational Reform is being channeled through option A.   Let’s refresh. SB51 which radicalized Delaware’s education was sprung out of nowhere by Sokola, and passed in a minute in the Senate, and with only 4 detractors in the House… HB 165 which ALEC’d Delaware’s educational laws, was developed by a secret Delaware Charter Group, whose secrecy was determined to actually violate Delaware Law, as ruled by the Attorney General’s office itself..  But before that ruling could come out, it was rushed through both Chambers and passed before anyone knew what was in it.  Suddenly we have 6 schools surprisingly being turned over into charters, It was announced 7 days ago, and today the meeting takes place, but only through a concerned citizens posting of the announcement did anyone know of it… (except for those invited in secret)…. In less than 19 days, these school systems will have to commit to this plan, or lose their schools. Something that affects  3000 families?

How could you possibly get feed back from 3000 families in 19 days?   Well, you could through those accountable to those people… UMMMM   THEIR REPRESENTATIVES!!!!!!!!!!!!

But no… They might mess up the secret plans… We can’t let anyone know about this until we’ve suckered punched them with the first blow…..

Our founding fathers would have called such tactics… British.  That just is not how we do things.

Jon’s loving father discovered that something called the Smarter Interim was to take place this fall.  It is a form of the Smarter Balanced Assessment.

In selling the Smarter Balanced Assessment, Governor Markell loudly proclaimed we be doing one test, not two. And the Synopsis for the Smarter Balanced Assessments, HB 334 actually says so….

This bill provides for the transition of the statewide student assessment system, the Delaware Comprehensive Student Assessment (DCAS), to the Smarter Balanced Assessment System (Smarter). Specifically, the bill removes references to multiple assessments.

So one would think that we’d be going to one test right?

Here is a graphic view of the schedule:  (Parental Discretion Advised)

test schedule

Click for larger size.  As you can see the Smarter Balanced Interim carries from November through the end of they year…   The Smarter Balance Assessment begins March 2nd.

Back to HB 334… vague wording was used to allow this.  It was no accident…  Here is what was stricken…

One assessment shall occur within 30 school days of the beginning of the academic year, the second assessment shall occur at a time established by the Department which will allow its results to guide education of students within the current school year. In addition, the Department shall administer end of course assessments in appropriate high school grades.  

That was the old DCAS which was a good test and which made 97% of Delaware’s teachers rightfully appear highly effective.  For unlike other assessments, teacher’s were measured on their own output alone.  One test at the beginning, and one at the end, which showed they improved students learning… 97% of the time…

But, though many legislators thought they were voting to go with only one test, after all the governor said so, the Secretary of Education said so, Dave Sokola and Darryl Scott said so,  and even the Synopsis said so, and the part stricken in the bill even said so!

So why do we have more than one test?  Was it because they were tricked.

At no point in the bill does it state that there will only be one test.  So even with the lines pulled requiring three windows to take state assessments across the year,  the letter “s” on the end of assessment”s’  was never deleted. By using a game of switcheroo, done by refering to other sections ((b) and (c)) the bill, the multiple assessment was sneaked through…

This second assessment is not against the law… just against the conditions under which the law was passed. For the ultimate law actually does little to define the test, but hands over to the Department of Education, the sole authority to assess kids however they see fit.  They are solely in charge of the schedule, content, and grading….

Jon’s loving father quotes an unnamed legislator as saying he was lied to.  He was under the assumption there would be one test and he voted on that because that was what he was hearing from constituents:  that there was too much testing.

But now the testing amounts won’t change,  But I’m guessing that legislator was the one who must now be getting a new career lined up after getting bumped off Primary Day, primarily for supporting HB 334 and helping move Common Core forward….

Just an example of the tricks used throughout these past two years to get the Common Core agenda into law before anyone could stop it.

From Fox News….  (yeah, yeah, I know….)

The quote:

“In mathematics, Common Core stops with Algebra 2.  Now, Algebra 2 is absolutely minimal preparation even to go to college…  One of the things they tout for Common Core is that it’s going to improve the STEM pipeline.  That’s what everybody tells me.  Well, the actual data is this.  If you came to college with only an Algebra 2 background and you wanted to major in a STEM area, you have a 1 in 50 chance, a 2% chance, of ever obtaining a degree in STEM.  In other areas, it’s the same.  In any technical area it’s the same.  This level of preparation is simply insufficient.”  – Dr. James Milgram

(One should note here that our pre-existing standard, the one existing long before Common Core, was sufficient.)