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Distribution of Wealth

For this chart the American population is divided by 20%s………

Distribution percents

From where can we get some money?

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Across our landscape there are very few pivotal landslide elections.  When they happen they create a new dominant party for a long time…

I can only think of four… FDR’s first two terms and Ronald Reagan’s two terms. Both set in motion a new philosophy and new institutions to enforce the continuation of that policy long after their respective deaths…

(Clinton’s 2nd term would almost qualify but its effect was squandered on Monica Lewinsky…  Doubt that? And you  just told me you are not from the South, Great Plains, or the mountainous West.) ..

Here are maps of what we are talking about…..

Election Electorial 1932

Election Electoral 1936 Election Electorial 1980 Elections Electoral 1984

The philosophy espoused by those of the heavily blue maps  lasted from 1933 to 2001.  A nice span of 68 years…   The philosophy espoused by those in the heavily red maps, overlaps a little, but most would say it is the primary driver of most policy today, which give it a lifetime stretching from 1981 to today… A lifespan so far of 33 years…

Today, we are consistently divided…..

Election Electoral 2008 Election Electoral 2012

Which kind of explains our current Federal government, now doesn’t it?  Actually it has never been more clear…

For your life to get better, we have to stop supporting equal government… Where both sides are balanced and nothing ever, gets down…  Currently in the House, there are radical new changes that will forever change America as we know it…  It can’t get passed the Senate …

Currently in the Senate, there are radical new changes that will forever change America as we know it… It can’t get passed the House….

2014 will be a pivotal year for several reasons.

A) There is no cap on how much can be spent.

B)  Voter turnout is consistently low.  So advertising will be the worst ever, meaning every vote that switches carries more weight.  Every voter who gives up in disgust, and does not vote, gives up that much more of a percentage on deciding the total vote…

C) Wealth will outspend the poor this year.  Wealth has the money;  80% of the population is unable to write a check to either political party….

D)  Both parties’ policies are streamlined into clear agendas.  One party (with money) is for policies that help the 1% do better and pay for them by hurting the 99%… The other party is for policies that help the 99% do better, and pays for them by hurting the top 1%….

E)  Because of the politics of doing business, all those media outlets in charge of telling you the news and sometimes the truth,  cannot in good conscious, tell you the truth anymore…   They simply can’t risk getting pushed off the buying spree…..

You have to choose who to help:  the rich or poor, and you have to vote,  no matter what obstacles they throw up in your way….   you must remember that those obstacles are there for a reason, and will remain there until we get either an all blue, or all red America showing up in Wikipedia on election day..  Because those obstacles are there solely to protect the losing parties advantage in an effort to keep America from going all blue…

This raising of the cap also means, that  if you are a CEO  planning an ad campaign that will be kicking off from late August through a holiday December… your ads won’t register with audiences until the day after election… Save your advertising money.   There is no way you can compete for airtime against someone who will pay any price to get his ad on the air…  Save your money…

My personal experience is that over the past two elections, the non political people I know mentally tuned out of ads… Ads no longer work.  What does work is the personal connection of  talking to real people…  There were almost no  campaign ad buys in 1932 or 1936.  And there were campaign limits on money spent in both 1980 and 1984….  Primarily both those sweeping groups of elections were decided upon word of mouth….

I used to get mad at conservative talk shows, until I realized there were only the same 5 people calling in…  Out of 3 million people…  Were they shills?  I don’t know but their voice prints were consistent.  Occasionally someone thinking the talk show was real would call in, but it was rare…

Fight apathy. This is where you come in… If you read this, you probably will look at the ads too… Your job is to interpret the ads to all you know as nothing more than  billionaires blowing smoke out of their orifices like they are lavishing in a Bangkok bordello.   These ads don’t correspond to real life.   People don’t hate their neighbor because they have an Obama or Romney sticker on their care… 99% of us say… “Oh, whatever”  ..  “Who gives a shit? Hey! Can you tell me where you bought your truck?”

The point is that all those red states are not all red deep inside… There are a lot of blues there too, at least 30% in the most red, and often in populous states, up to 49%….  Human beings living in those states have a lot more clout than some clever ad that simply makes up stuff around a table and then pretends it it true, using actors, and trying to crush the airwaves with massive volume before the fact-checkers get the messages out calling it all bunk..

It is We, The People versus They The  Billionaires.   It is a game of Monopoly in its final rounds and we only own a monopoly on the yellow squares on the back side…   Our only hope left  is that we get to shuffle the stack the Chance cards every time we vote…   And if you don’t want to go through this all over again in two more years, with more unlimited funding  in 2016, you need to make sure that despite $4 billion being spent this mid term election, it does zero good to the Koch’s or anyone else…

If we can get a Blue House, we will have a blue Senate, and we can move forward with a blue president…. it’s almost worth dying for.

It’s all about word of mouth…  And be nice… Republicans aren’t  bad people anymore than Democrats, and when you talk to them realize you probably look as weird to them, a they do looking right back at you.  And trust me, if you read the news and blogs you would already  know that  the majority of Republicans are looking for something new.  They just don’t know what. And should  you need a shot of hope?  Cast your eye on these  electoral maps which are of the elections just before the ones above  when the massive tidal waves made their landfall…..

Election Electoral 1976 Electoral Election 1928

Things can change quickly when everyone individually just gets fed up that things are not going their way… At 99%, the numbers are in our favor…

But it is all about you. Now get out and  start talking. Tell the truth…  Be nice.

I wonder if we could get 2 million to show up for a march in DC against billionaires buying out our elections?  We could, but  it would take some work, but  that would be a very effective message  against an unmatched $4 billion being spent to prevent democracy.

Our message would be real, with real people.  Their’s as fake as Mr. Ed….. (that is who David Koch looks like I think; compare the chins)…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 2011, 46.2 million people in the US were living in poverty and the nation’s official poverty rate was 15 percent, up from 14.3 percent in 2009, according to the US Census Bureau. That figure appears to be the highest number seen in the 52 years for which poverty estimates have been recorded…

The predominant face of the poor is white.

Economic insecurity among whites is said to be more common than is shown in the government’s poverty data, engulfing over 76 percent of white adults by the time they turn 60..

Economic  insecurity approaching 76%….. How does this end the middle class designation?

Let us review what is the middle class.  It is the class in the middle… Start and stop points and change depending on who want to show what, but for the most part, the middle class would have a center point around the 50% margin… Hence: middle class….

10%     20%     30%     40%     50%     60%     70%     80%     90%      

                            XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX 

Sort of what you’d expect… the area above the poverty line and just below the rich……But based on current data now released from the Census Bureau, (and this is no secret to people in public schools) over 80% of America has been at or below poverty levels in its lifetime… It really doesn’t matter when.  You could be financially stable through your whole life and then get termed at age 60.  The effect is the same. You could face 50% age group unemployment right out of college and use odd jobs and part time jobs to stay alive. The effect is the same.  The mark today is that 80% face economic insecurity.  Can we just call that poor?  Isn’t that the definition of poor?  Someone who doesn’t have enough to be secure in today’s society?

Therefore if we take the middle of those from where the poor end at 80%, then we get a middle class graphic looking like this:

10%     20%     30%     40%     50%     60%     70%     80%     90%                                                                                                            XXX

This is the official version of today’s America rendered by the US Census bureau…. Times have changed…

Compare that to where it was under Bill Clinton in 1999 before Republicans took over….

10%     20%     30%     40%     50%     60%     70%     80%     90%     

                             XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX 

No offense to my Republican friends but this (which sad to say is exactly what I predicted in 2000), is what you get when you don’t tax progressively. We now have only 2 classes; The 1%  and the 99%.

The fix? Is to tax the top 1% who can well afford even a purely theoretical 100% taxation without hardship, and use that money for jobs…. Just jobs. More government contracts.  This is America’s quick answer… and it must be decided in this election 2014 that we will take it.  Against all odds, we need both chambers in Democrats’ hands., not for Democrats, but for America. It’s the only way is to defeat Republicanism… We are not talking individual candidates.  We are talking about a philosophy that stresses the lazy poor 80% must continue to suffer even more to pay for the one percent’s excesses, and not as it should be, … the other way around…

 

 

 

Synopsis:  This bill removes the per-student funding to all Charter schools and allows them to be funded in the same manner as the Vocational Technical School Districts.

Section 1. Amend §509-518 of Title 14 of the Delaware Code by making insertions as shown by underlining and deletions as shown by strikethrough as follows:

(For an easier read of the new law, please jump to a cleaned up code version (without the deletions) which is a much easier read.)

§ 509 School financing.

(a) Charter schools shall be eligible for public funds under procedures established by this section. Notwithstanding that this Code may establish procedures for the funding of a public school choice program and that such program may include charter schools among those schools which students may choose,

(b) A charter school shall receive a payment with respect to each of its students equal to:  in the exact same manner as do the Vocational Technical School Districts within Delaware

(1) From the State on or before November 30, the entire yearly funding equivalent to ofpublic charter school‘s Division I staffing, including fractional funding of partial units, excluding  funding for a Superintendent, Division II– All Other Costs and Energy funding, minor capital improvements and school building maintenance funding, will be  generated by the annual student unit count conducted on September 30 of each year in accordance with Department of Education regulations. by the General Assembly as a line item in its previous fiscal year’s budget, ending June 30th of that same year.  Minor capital improvements shall continue to be funded in the same manner as the Vocational Technical School Districts. In the case of Division III — Equalization, a charter school shall not receive from the State an any amount that is determined by the weighting of the Division III per unit values that would have been generated by its students had they been counted in and that amount, shall remains and stay within each student’s  their district of residence. In addition A charter school shall not receive a prorated portion of any other funds appropriated to the Department of Education that are is intended to be allocated on a student, employee or school state share. For accounting purposes only and not for the purposes of calculating such funding, shall each charter school student shall be counted in a separately reported unit count of at the charter school, which makes note of that child’s district of residence,  and though not physically counted for any purposes in the student’s district of residence, that money which in that child’s district was originally allocated per that student must now remain in the designated home district of that child’s residence. For any other partially funded unit generated at a charter school, the charter school is free to negotiate the use of such unit with the chartering district, and other public school districts, in order to purchase central custodial, administrative, clerical, direct teaching or educationally related services. If such an agreement is not negotiated, a payment based on the average State cost per unit shall be payable to both the charter school and the district issuing the charter, provided that the sum of both fractions justifies an additional unit.  The State shall advance 75% of the anticipated funding pursuant to this subsection at the beginning of each fiscal year, provided that the charter school has provided the Department of Education with a preliminary roster of its students on or before May 1 of such year, and does not maintain the status of formal review or probation. The status of formal review or probation shall prompt the Department of Education to advance a level of funding appropriate to pending administrative action. A final roster shall be due September 30. Notwithstanding the above, a charter school in its first year of operation shall receive 50% of the anticipated funding pursuant to this subsection at the beginning of the fiscal year, provided that the charter school has provided the Department of Education with a preliminary roster of its students on or before May 1 of such year. The charter school shall receive an additional 25% of the funding due pursuant to this subsection on October 1 of its first year in operation and shall receive the remaining 25% on February 1 of its first year in operation, provided that the school has completed and posted the required standardized financial report forms and the Department has reviewed those forms and determined that the school’s finances will not at that time lead the Department to submit the school for formal review pursuant to § 515 of this title. A determination that the school will be submitted for formal review shall prompt the Department of Education to advance a level of funding appropriate to pending administrative action. The percentage of funding to be provided to charter schools on July 1 and October 1 pursuant to the above may be increased in the Secretary’s discretion.

(2) From the school districts in which its students reside on or before November 30 of each year, the local cost per student (regular or special education, as the case may be), net of transportation expenses provided for pursuant to § 508 of this title. The school districts in which its students reside shall advance at least 35% of the anticipated funding pursuant to this subsection at the beginning of each fiscal year provided that the charter school has provided the school districts of residence with a preliminary roster of its students on or before May 1 of such year. This advance may be paid from Division III — Equalization funds if the district’s prior fiscal year current expense local funds balance was 20% or less pursuant to § 1507 of this title. A final roster shall be due September 30. In the event of the failure of a school district to make timely payments to a charter school as required in this paragraph, the Department of Education shall have the authority to direct transfer of such funds from future State funding allocations after the school district receives reasonable notice and an opportunity to be heard, as set forth in the rules and regulations established by the Department.

(c) If a parent or legal guardian of a student enrolled outside the district pursuant to this chapter moves during the school year to a district different from the district in which that parent’s or legal guardian’s child resided at the time of the annual unit count, the child’s first district of residence shall continue to be responsible  to receive any portions of payments allotted for that child  to the charter school for the balance of the school year pursuant to paragraph (b)(2) of this section. The child’s new district of residence shall be responsible the recipient  for all such payments revenue during succeeding years.

(d) The Department of Education shall annually calculate the local cost per student expended by each school district for each type of student for the year immediately preceding based on the formula set forth in subsection (e) of this section, adjusted by a factor necessary to fund the charter school on a basis reasonably equivalent to the current year local cost per student, which factor shall be established  and shall give that total cost along with the estimated enrollment of each Charter School to the General Assembly’s Joint Budget Committee before the completion of  the annual Appropriations Act. The Department shall annually certify each district’s local cost per student expenditure, as if all Charter students still resided within that district by September 1st of each year.

(e)  Local cost per student as used in this section shall be calculated as follows:

Total local Operating Expenditure in Preceding Fiscal Year

Total Division I Units minus

Special School Units minus

Vocational Deduct plus

Vocational Units

Number of Pupils or Pupil Minutes per Unit

Where:

Total local Operating = Sum of all expenditures

Expenditure in from local sources minus

Preceding FY local expenditures fortuition minus

local expenditures for debt service minus

local expenditures for Minor Capital Improvement

Division I Units for each= Division I Units certified by District or Special School the State Board of Education as of September 30 of each year…

Pupils or Pupil Minutes =

Number of Pupils or Pupil per Unit Minutes required for one
particular unit of funding as specified in §1703 of this Title

(f) For any student, who because of educational need requires services that are appropriately financed pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 6 of this title, either at the outset or subsequent to a decision to enroll in a charter school, the student’s district of residence shall no longer continue to remain financially responsible for such student and the charter school shall receive from such district request from the Department of Education, a payment determined in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 6 of this title, that would have been allotted to the Department of Education by the General Assembly for this purpose,  Beginning fiscal year 2015, the General Assembly will provide a charter fund of $1 million dollars to the Department of Education to be used for assisting charter students requiring additional resources to meet their educational needs.

(g) Any payment received by a charter school from the General Assembly pursuant to this section may be used for current operations, minor capital improvements, debt service payments or tuition payments.

(h) The Department of Education, in consultation with the Office of Management and Budget, shall annually publish a list of vacant and unused buildings and vacant and unused portions of buildings that are owned by this State or by school districts in this State and that may be suitable for the operation of a charter school. The Department of Education, in consultation with the Office of Management and Budget, shall make the list available to applicants for charter schools and to existing charter schools. The list shall include the address of each building, a short description of the building and the name of the owner of the building.

(i) In return for the receipt by a charter school of any special allocated  state funds allocated directly to the school for extra time, professional development, driver education or disciplinary programs, the school shall provide such programs.

(j) If after September 30  April 15th a pupil ceases to be enrolled in a charter school and is thereafter enrolled in a reorganized school district for the balance of the fiscal year, nothing contained in this section shall prevent a charter school which has received any funding for the student and the school district in which the student is subsequently enrolled from entering into an agreement providing for the proration of student funding between or among the charter school and the school district in which the student is subsequently enrolled. Funding in any subsequent fiscal year shall be as otherwise provided in this Code.   no funding transfer shall take place, since that child’s assessment is already designated towards his district of residence.

(k) A charter school shall display on its website as do all public schools, all standardized financial report forms for the current fiscal year and the final monthly standardized financial report forms for each previous fiscal year of operation. Charter schools that are required to file Internal Revenue Service Form 990 shall post the current and prior year Form 990 on the website as well.

(l) Charter schools shall have the same access to conduit bond financing as any other nonprofit organization, and no state or local government unit may impose any condition or restriction on a charter school’s approval solely because the applicant is a public charter school. It is the further intent that a charter school shall apply for conduit funding to issuers within the State unless more favorable terms may be found elsewhere.all Vocational Technical School Districts within Delaware

(m) The Department of Education shall administer a performance fund for charter schools, to be known as the “Charter School Performance Fund.” The Department of Education shall establish threshold eligibility requirements for applicants desiring to apply for funding, which shall include but not be limited to a proven track record of success, as measured by a performance framework established by the charter school’s authorizer or comparable measures as defined by the Department. The Department of Education shall also establish criteria to evaluate applications for funding, which shall include but not be limited to the availability of supplemental funding from nonstate sources at a ratio to be determined by the Department. The Department of Education shall prioritize those applications from applicants that have:

(1) Developed high-quality plans for start-up or expansion; or

(2) Serve high-need students, as defined by the Department.

The Fund shall be subject to appropriation and shall not exceed $5 million annually.

70 Del. Laws, c. 179, § 270 Del. Laws, c. 186, § 171 Del. Laws, c. 132, §§ 360, 36171 Del. Laws, c. 180, § 2671 Del. Laws, c. 354, § 38372 Del. Laws, c. 395, § 35173 Del. Laws, c. 164, §§ 9, 1075 Del. Laws, c. 88, § 16(2)75 Del. Laws, c. 89, § 42578 Del. Laws, c. 77, § 33(b)78 Del. Laws, c. 187, §§ 2, 379 Del. Laws, c. 51, §§ 3, 4.;

§ 510 State assistance.

(a) The Department of Education shall distribute information announcing the availability of the charter school program, explaining the powers and responsibilities of a charter school contained in this chapter, and describing the application process to each school district and public post-secondary educational institution, and through press releases to each major newspaper in the State.

(b) The Department of Education shall provide technical assistance to potential charter school applicants upon request.

(c) The Department of Education shall provide technical and other forms of assistance to charter schools on the same basis as to school districts.

(d) The Department of Education shall, in concert with the approving authority and the applicant, apply for available federal or foundation grants providing funding for the planning and start-up of charter schools and the Department of Education shall administer such funds as may be appropriated by the General Assembly for the purpose of assisting in the planning and start-up of charter schools.

70 Del. Laws, c. 179, § 271 Del. Laws, c. 180, § 27.;

§ 511 Approval procedure.

(a) An approved charter school application, together with such conditions imposed pursuant to subsection (l) of this section, shall be the basis for a charter granted to the charter school by the approving authority pursuant to this chapter and shall be governed by the terms of this chapter.  Charters must first receive a majority approval from the local district’s school board in whose district they are located. Upon approval of a charter school application by that district, the Department of Education shall present applicants seeking a charter from the state with a charter contract (“Charter Contract”) that clearly defines the respective roles, powers, and responsibilities of the school and the approving authority and incorporates the provisions of the performance agreement entered into between the charter school and its approving authority pursuant to CDR 14-200-275. Other approving authorities may choose to present applications they approve with such a Charter Contract. Where Once a Charter Contract is utilized has been approved by the Department, both the school Charter School and the approving authority that school’s local school district shall execute the Department of Education’s Charter Contract. Notwithstanding anything in this chapter to the contrary, the initial term of a newly approved charter shall expire at the end of the fifth  third fiscal year following the fiscal year in which the charter was initially approved, and any subsequent charter renewal term shall expire at the end of each successive fifth third fiscal year thereafter unless extended pursuant to § 514A(b) of this title. If an approved charter is modified to delay the initial opening of the school, then the expiration date of the initial term of the charter shall be adjusted accordingly.

(b)(1) Charters shall be modified by the same procedure and based on the same criteria as they are approved. When the approving authority is the Department of Education  local school district, minor modifications to a charter that are requested by the charter school only may be approved by the Secretary  District Superintendent subject to rules and regulations established by the local district’s Board of Education with the approval of the State Board. Modifications associated with the provision of student transportation services as a result of changes to the Annual Appropriations Act to § 508 of this title shall be considered a minor modification.

(2) A request for modification to increase a charter school’s total authorized enrollment by more than 15% shall be considered a major modification, regardless of whether the additional students will attend school at the current location or at a separate location.

(3) In addition to meeting the approval criteria established in § 512 of this title, an authorizer considering an application for a new charter school or for a modification as described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section in which the increased enrollment will occur less than 18 months from the date of application (an “expansion”), shall also consider the potential positive and negative impact of the proposed new school or expansion on the schools and the community from which the charter school’s new students will likely be drawn. In reviewing the impact, the authorizer shall consider all information furnished to it during the new charter school application process and may exercise its reasonable discretion in determining whether the proposed new school or expansion is contrary to the best interests of the community to be served, including both those students likely to attend the charter school and those students likely to attend traditional public schools in the community.  Local impact of the charter shall be considered during the initial application process before that district’s Board of Education, which oversees the locality in which that charter wishes to locate.

(4) Information regarding impact shall be considered in conjunction with the factors in § 512 of this title but shall not alone provide the basis for disapproval of an application for a new charter application or an expansion. The information regarding impact may, however, be among the bases for disapproval of an application or expansion if at least 1 criteria in § 512 of this title is also deemed not satisfied by the authorizer. The information regarding impact may, by itself or in combination with other factors, form the basis for conditions being placed on the approval.

(c) Charter school applications shall be submitted to a local school board or the Department for approval as an approving authority. Whenever a charter school seeks a charter from the Department as approving authority, such approval shall require the assent of both the Secretary and the State Board, as shall any action pursuant to §§ 515 and 516 of this title. The approving authority shall be responsible for approval of the charter school pursuant to this section and for continuing oversight of each charter school it approves.

(d) The Department shall make an initial secondary review of all charter school applications it receives forwarded to it by the local district Superintendents, in order to assess the completeness and viability of each such application based on the application submission criteria established in this title. Upon a finding that an application does not warrant a full review, the Department shall notify the applicant in writing of the deficiency or deficiencies and the application shall receive no further consideration. Each local district that is asked by an applicant to serve as an approving authority may, in its discretion, undertake such an initial sufficiency review and make such an initial sufficiency determination.

(e) Applicants seeking a charter approval from the Department that have submitted an application deemed by both the local distict and Department sufficient to receive a full review, shall be offered an opportunity for an interview in support of the application. Such interviews will allow the Department to assess applicant capacity, allow it to clarify information provided in the application, and gather additional information. The information gained in the interview process may be among the factors considered by the approving authority in approving or denying an application.

(f) Potential charter school applicants may engage in discussions with a potential approving authority before submitting an application for approval to establish a charter school.

(g)(1) Except as noted in paragraph (g)(2) of this section, new charter school applications shall be submitted to an their local district approving authority between November 1 and December 31 for schools to be established and prepared to admit students on or after the second August 1 thereafter.

(2) Applications by a highly successful charter school operator as described in subsection (p) of this section shall be submitted to an approving authority between November 1 and December 31 for schools to be established and prepared to admit students on or after the August 1 thereafter. The application submission dates in this subsection may be amended by agreement of the authorizer and the applicant if necessary to allow the applicant to serve students who would otherwise be displaced due to the closure of an existing charter school.

(3) Applications to renew a charter shall be submitted to the local approving authority on or before September 1 of the year immediately preceding the calendar year in which the school’s current charter term will expire., except that all applications to renew a charter that expires on or before December 31, 2012, shall be submitted to the approving authority on or before October 15, 2011.

(4) Charter school applications which propose the conversion of an existing public school, or a part thereof to charter school status must be submitted to an a local approving authority on or before October 30 if the application proposes that the newly converted charter school is to be established and prepared to admit students for the next ensuing school year.

(5) If the date for submitting an application or commencing the school’s instructional program shall fall on a weekend or state holiday, the time for such shall be continued to the first working day thereafter.

(h) Any local school board may limit the number of new charter school applications it will consider in any year or the number of charters it will grant, but within 20 working days after December 31 must hold a public meeting to decide whether or not to consider it. A local school board shall not be required to accept any new charter school applications for a charter school unless, by September 1 of each year the school board shall affirmatively vote to accept such applications.

(i) If an the local approving authority decides to consider a charter application, the local approving authority must rule on whether to approve the application at a public meeting within 90 working days after December 31.

(j) Within 5 days of deciding to consider an application, the local  approving authority shall form an accountability committee to review the charter school application. The accountability committee’s report to the local school board shall address the approval criteria set forth in § 512 of this title. The committee shall meet with the applicant in the course of its investigation and provide the applicant the opportunity to review and comment on the committee’s report 15 days before it is issued to the approving authority. The committee’s final report shall be provided to the applicant and be made available to the public.

(k) After giving 15 days public notice, the local approving authority shall hold public hearings to assist in its decision whether to approve a charter application. At least 1 such hearing shall be held prior to the issuance of the accountability committee’s final report on that application. The approving authority shall, in advance of the 15-day public notice period, post any and all charter applications under consideration on a public website maintained by the approving authority, and during this public notice period shall accept electronically submitted and written comments from the public.

(l) Subject to any limitations imposed by the local approving authority pursuant to subsection (h) of this section, if the application is found by the approving authority of the State Board to meet the criteria set forth in § 512 and complying with the approval process in § 511 of this title, it shall approve the application. The State Board’s approving authority may approve an application subject to such conditions as the approving authority, in its sole discretion, may deem appropriate to ensure the applicant’s continuing compliance with the approval criteria.

(m) If an application is made to the Department or a local board as an approving authority and the charter application is not approved, such decision shall be final and not subject to judicial review.

(n) All applications for a charter shall contain an affirmative representation by the applicant that no later than June 15 immediately preceding the authorized opening date of the school, the applicant shall secure a certificate of occupancy, either temporary or final, for the premises in which the school is to be located, provided that any temporary certificate of occupancy must permit occupancy at the premises by school staff and students for school purposes. If the charter is approved and the charter holder shall subsequently fail to obtain the necessary certificate of occupancy as required by this section, the opening of the school shall be delayed by 1 year from the date previously authorized by the approving authority and the charter shall be placed on probation subject to the terms and conditions imposed by the Department of Education with the consent of the State Board of Education. No waivers are available for this requirement.

(o) A local school board that approves an application for a charter school may do so only on the condition that the charter school is located in and provides all educational and related services, with the exception of transportation services and other K-12 noninstructional services and activities, within the boundaries of the approving local school board’s district lines. Once approved, the charter school may not subsequently change its location from the school district specified in its originally approved charter.

(p) ”Highly successful charter school operator” means an entity that currently operates or whose principals currently operate 1 or more highly successful charter schools showing sustained high levels of student growth and achievement and sustained fiscal stewardship, as further defined by Department regulation. Notwithstanding the provisions of this chapter, for purposes of this definition the phrase “charter school” shall include public schools operated under a charter regardless of whether the schools are located or organized in Delaware. A highly successful charter school operator may be authorized to operate a charter school in the timeframe provided by paragraph (g)(2) of this section provided that the application is submitted for the purpose of operating a charter school at the site of and serving students currently attending a charter school whose charter has been revoked, has not been renewed, or whose charter is on formal review and whose board has agreed to abandon their charter.

(q) The charter school application shall include a disclosure of any ownership or financial interest in the charter school, including but not limited to the building and real property to be used in the operation of the charter school, by the charter school founders and the board of directors of the proposed charter school. If the building and real property to be used in operation of the charter school are not known at the time of application, disclosures pertaining to those interests shall be made once the building and real property to be used in operation of the charter school become known. In addition, the board of directors of the charter school shall have a continuing duty to disclose such interests to the approving authority pursuant to this chapter during the terms of any charter. The charter school and the Department shall promptly disclose the information required by this subsection to any member of the public upon request.

(r) Charter school board members and founders shall be required to complete the criminal background checks in the same manner as persons seeking employment with a public school pursuant to § 8571(a) of Title 11. In addition, the authorizer shall complete a check of the Child Protection Registry established by § 921 of Title 16 for charter school founders and board members. The results of said background and Child Protection Registry checks shall be provided to the authorizer for review as part of the application process and on an ongoing basis if new board members are seated or current board members are convicted of a crime or placed on the Child Protection Registry. Any person convicted of a felony offense or of any crime against a child in this State or any other jurisdiction shall not be permitted to serve as a founder or member of a charter school board of directors. No individual shall be permitted to serve as a charter school founder or board member if the individual would not be permitted to be employed in a public school pursuant to § 8563 of Title 11 regarding the Child Protection Registry. Other crimes may be considered disqualifying, in the discretion of the authorizer. The State Bureau of Identification may release any subsequent criminal history to the authorizer. Individuals currently serving as board members of a charter school must complete a criminal background check and the Department shall complete a Child Protection Registry check for such members on or before February 1, 2012.

(s) The founder or board member shall be provided with a copy of all information forwarded to the authorizer pursuant to subsection (r) of this section. Information obtained under subsection (r) of this section is confidential and may only be disclosed to the chief officer and 1 additional person in each authorizing body.

(t) Costs associated with obtaining criminal history information and child protection registry checks shall be paid by the applicant.

70 Del. Laws, c. 179, § 270 Del. Laws, c. 425, § 34671 Del. Laws, c. 132, §§ 357-359, 371, 37271 Del. Laws, c. 180, § 2872 Del. Laws, c. 118, § 372 Del. Laws, c. 473, § 173 Del. Laws, c. 164, §§ 11-1473 Del. Laws, c. 313, §§ 1, 874 Del. Laws, c. 360, §§ 2, 3, 675 Del. Laws, c. 112, § 176 Del. Laws, c. 79, § 14076 Del. Laws, c. 280, § 39578 Del. Laws, c. 187, §§ 4-779 Del. Laws, c. 51, § 5.;

§ 512 Approval criteria.

Subject to the process prescribed in § 511 of this title, charter school applications shall be in the form established by the local approving authority and shall be approved if, after the exercise of due diligence and good faith, the local approving authority finds that the proposed charter demonstrates that:

(1) The individuals and entities submitting the application are experienced and qualified to start and operate a charter school, and to implement the school’s proposed educational program. Certified teachers, parents and members of the community in which the school is to be located must be involved in the development of the proposed charter school. At the time at which the school commences its instructional program and at all times thereafter, the board of directors must include a teacher from at least 1 of the charter schools operated by the board and at least 1 parent of a student enrolled in a charter school operated by the board;

(2) The chosen form of organization, identified in the articles of incorporation and by-laws, or the membership agreement, conforms with the Delaware General Corporation Law;

(3) The mission statement, goals and educational objectives are consistent with the description of legislative intent set forth in § 501 of this title and the restrictions on charter school operations set forth in § 506 in this title;

(4) The school has set goals for student performance and will utilize satisfactory indicators not limited exclusively to state tests, to determine whether its students meet or exceed such goals and the academic standards set by the State. The indicators shall include the assessments required for students in other public schools, although the charter school may adopt additional performance standards or assessment requirements, and shall include timelines for the achievement of student performance goals and the assessment of such performance;

(5) The school proposes a satisfactory plan for evaluating student performance and procedures for taking corrective action in the event that student performance at the charter school falls below such standards which are reasonably likely to succeed;

(6) The school’s educational program, including curriculum and instructional strategies, has the potential to improve student performance; and must be aligned to meet the Delaware Content Standards and state program requirements, and in the case of a charter high school, state graduation requirements. High school programs must provide driver education. The educational program at all charter schools must include the provision by the school of extra instructional time for at-risk students, summer school and other services required to be provided by school districts pursuant to the provisions of § 153 of this title. A previously approved charter school may continue to operate in compliance with the terms of its current approval, but its charter shall not be renewed unless the school shall submit an application for renewal in full compliance with the requirements of this subsection;

(7) The school’s educational program sets forth appropriate strategies to be employed to accommodate the needs of at-risk students and those needing special education services;

(8) The plan for the school is economically viable, based on a review of the school’s proposed budget of projected revenues and expenditures for the first 3 years, the plan for starting the school, and the major contracts planned for equipment and services, leases, improvements, purchases of real property and insurance;

(9) The school’s financial and administrative operations meet or exceed the same standards, procedures and requirements as a school district. If a charter school proposes to operate outside the State’s pension and/or benefits systems, a specific memorandum of understanding shall be developed and executed by the charter school, the approving authority, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, the Controller General and the Secretary of Finance to assure that the State’s fiduciary duties and interests in the proper use of appropriated funds and as a benefits and pension trustee are fulfilled and protected, the State’s financial reporting requirements are satisfied, and the interests of charter school employees are protected. All charter schools shall operate within the Delaware Financial Management System (DFMS) and be subject to all of the same policies and procedures which govern other agencies operating within such system, except that any charter school previously approved to operate outside of the DFMS may continue to so operate subject to the terms of its memorandum of understanding until such time as the school’s charter is renewed pursuant to this chapter;

(10) The assessment of the school’s potential legal liability, and the types and limits of insurance coverage the school plans to obtain, are adequate;

(11) The procedures the school plans to follow to discipline students and ensure its students’ adherence to school attendance requirements comply with state and federal law;

(12) The procedures the school plans to follow to assure the health and safety of students, employees and guests of the school while they are on school property are adequate and that the charter school will comply with applicable provisions of local, state and federal law, including the provisions of Chapter 85 of Title 11;

(13) The school shall have a satisfactory plan for timely transferring student data and records to the Department of Education;

(14) The school’s board of directors shall annually certify to the Department, on a form to be provided by the Department, that prior to the payment of any fees or other sums to any management company employed by the board, the board will insure that sufficient revenues of the school are devoted to adequately support the school’s proposed educational program. Such form of certification may require documentation of all actual or proposed expenditures by the school. Failure to provide sufficient funds to adequately support the school’s proposed education program shall be grounds for revocation of the school’s charter.

(15) The school shall have a satisfactory plan to ensure the effectiveness of its board of trustees, including governance trainings conducted for any new board members and at a minimum of once every 3 years; and

(16) The school shall have a satisfactory plan for procedures it will follow in the case of the closure or dissolution of the school, including a plan to set aside sufficient funds to cover the salaries owed to those employees who are paid over a 12-month period. For a new applicant granted under this chapter, the application shall include a reasonable plan to establish sufficient available balances pursuant to § 516(1) of this title.

70 Del. Laws, c. 179, § 271 Del. Laws, c. 180, § 2971 Del. Laws, c. 354, § 38673 Del. Laws, c. 164, §§ 15-2173 Del. Laws, c. 313, §§ 9, 1075 Del. Laws, c. 88, § 21(7)78 Del. Laws, c. 187, § 879 Del. Laws, c. 51, § 6.;

§ 513 Reporting and oversight.

(a) On or before December 1, each charter school not seeking renewal of its charter shall produce an annual report for the school year ending the previous June, which shall:

(1) Discuss the school’s progress in meeting overall student performance goals and standards;

(2) Discuss the innovation occurring at the charter school, including but not limited to the areas of curriculum development, instruction, student culture and discipline, community and parental involvement, teacher and staff development, school operations and management, and extracurricular and after-school programming; and

(3) Contain a financial statement setting forth by appropriate categories the school’s revenues and expenditures and assets and liabilities.

Each charter school seeking renewal of its charter shall produce an annual report on or before September 30. The approving authority may, in its discretion and for good cause shown, elect to accept an annual report submitted subsequent to this deadline. To ensure that such reports provide parents and approving authorities with clear and comparable information about the performance of charter schools, the Department of Education shall prescribe a uniform format for such reports, which may be supplemented by requirements set by the approving authority for schools it has chartered. The charter school shall contract to have an audit of the business and financial transactions, records, and accounts after July 1 for the prior fiscal year. The results of the audit shall be shared with the Department of Education by October 1. A charter school shall display on its website the annual report including financial statement and audit required by this subsection.

(b) The annual report shall be submitted to the approving authority, the Department and the State Board. Employees of the school and parents of students attending the school shall receive a copy free of charge, upon request. The reports shall be public records pursuant to Chapter 100 of Title 29.

(c) The Department of Education, the State Board, and the approving authority may conduct financial, programmatic, or compliance audits of a charter school. In cooperation with the Department, the approving authority shall conduct such audits no less often than every 3 years. The State Auditor shall conduct an audit of all charter school funds annually on the same basis as applied to regular school districts.

(d) The Department of Education shall notify the superintendents of all reorganized and vocational-technical school districts of receipt of new charter school applications within 30 days of the close of the application deadline. The Department of Education shall also notify the superintendent of a reorganized school district of any applications for a major charter modification submitted by a charter school with a facility located within their district.

(e) Local school boards shall notify the superintendents of all reorganized and vocational-technical school districts of receipt of new charter school applications within 30 days of the close of the application deadline.

70 Del. Laws, c. 179, § 271 Del. Laws, c. 180, § 3073 Del. Laws, c. 313, §§ 4, 1278 Del. Laws, c. 187, § 9;79 Del. Laws, c. 51, § 779 Del. Laws, c. 128, § 2.;

§ 514 State reports on the charter school program.

Annually, the Department shall prepare a report for the Governor, the General Assembly, and the State Board of Education on the success or failure of charter schools and propose changes in state law necessary to improve or change the charter school program. Such report shall contain a section comparing the per student expenditures of charter schools, considering all sources of such expenditures, with those of other public schools. Such report shall also contain:

(1) The Secretary of Education’s analysis of, recommendations relating to, and proposed changes relating to Delaware education laws, in light of the content of annual reports submitted pursuant to § 513 of this title; and

(2) The Secretary’s assessment of specific opportunities and barriers relating to the implementation of charter schools’ innovations in the broader Delaware public education school system.

70 Del. Laws, c. 179, § 271 Del. Laws, c. 180, § 3179 Del. Laws, c. 128, § 2.;

§ 514A Renewals and nonrenewals.

(a) Four years after a charter school has commenced its instructional program pursuant to this chapter and not later than every 5 years thereafter, the approving authority shall, upon notice to the charter school, review the performance of the charter school to determine its compliance with its charter and its satisfaction of the criteria set forth in this title for the purposes of renewal or nonrenewal.

(b) A charter school may be renewed for successive 5-year terms of duration. An approving authority may grant renewal with specific conditions for necessary improvements to a charter school. Where a charter school has demonstrated an outstanding record of performance, an approving authority may grant it a renewal term of 10 years. Any charter school receiving such an extended renewal term shall, at the midpoint of the 10-year charter, be subject to an annual performance and program evaluation that includes academic, financial and operations data that looks back to all of the years of the charter up to that point. If, upon this evaluation, the approving authority determines that the charter school’s level of performance is deficient by renewal standards, the approving authority may initiate the formal renewal and nonrenewal process set forth below.

(c) No later than April 30, the approving authority shall issue a charter school renewal report and charter renewal application guidance to any charter school whose charter will expire the following year. The renewal report shall summarize the charter school’s performance record to date, based on the data required by 79 Del. Laws, c. 51 and the charter contract, and shall provide notice of any weaknesses or concerns perceived by the approving authority concerning the charter school that may jeopardize its position in seeking renewal if not timely rectified. The charter school shall have 10 working days to respond to the renewal report and submit any corrections or clarifications for the report.

(d) The renewal process shall, at a minimum, provide an opportunity for the charter school to:

(1) Present additional evidence, beyond the data contained in the renewal report, supporting its case for charter renewal;

(2) Describe improvements undertaken or planned for the school; and

(3) Detail the school’s plans for the next charter term.

(e) The renewal application guidance shall include the criteria that will guide the approving authority’s renewal decisions. Renewal determinations by the Department of Education shall be based on its performance framework, the terms set forth in the Charter Contract, and shall take account of the school’s performance agreement with the approving authority, consistent with CDR 14-200-275, and with 79 Del. Laws, c. 51. Other approving authorities may choose to adopt the criteria utilized by the Department of Education. Each approving authority shall develop a rubric based on its criteria for evaluating renewal applications and shall provide this rubric to applicants as part of the renewal application guidance. The approving authority shall publish the renewal application guidance on its website and make it available in written form upon request.

(f) No later than September 30, the governing board of a charter school seeking renewal shall submit a renewal application to the approving authority pursuant to the renewal application guidance issued by the approving authority. The approving authority shall rule by resolution on the renewal application no later than 30 working days after the filing of the renewal application.

(g) In making charter renewal decisions, every approving authority shall:

(1) Ground its decisions in evidence of the school’s performance over the term of the charter contract in accordance with the performance agreement set forth in the charter contract;

(2) Ensure that data used in making renewal decisions are available to the school and the public; and

(3) Provide a public report summarizing the evidence basis for each decision.

79 Del. Laws, c. 51, § 8.;

§ 515 Oversight and revocation process.

(a) The approving authority shall be responsible for oversight of the charter schools it approves.

(b) In addition to the review required by § 514A(a) of this title, the approving authority may notify a charter school of potential violations of its charter and submit the charter to formal review to determine whether the charter school is violating the terms of its charter and whether to order remedial measures pursuant to subsection (f) of this section.

(c) The approving authority shall issue its decision within 90 working days of giving the charter school notice pursuant to this subsection (c). An accountability committee appointed by the approving authority shall conduct the initial review pursuant to subsection (b) or (c) of this section. The accountability committee’s report to the approving authority shall address the relevant criteria set forth in §§ 512 and 516 of this title. The committee shall meet with the applicant in the course of its investigation and provide the applicant the opportunity to review and comment on the committee’s report 15 days before it is issued to the approving authority. The committee’s final report shall be provided to the applicant and made available to the public.

(d) If the accountability committee reports probable grounds for remedial measures pursuant to subsection (g) of this section, the approving authority shall hold public hearings to assist in its decision whether the criteria set forth for remedial action in § 516 of this title have been satisfied, after giving the charter school 30 days notice. The school shall be given the opportunity to respond to the accountability committee’s report at the meeting. Members of the public shall be given the opportunity to comment at the meeting.

(e) If the accountability committee reports that the school has complied with its charter and the criteria set forth in § 512 of this title, the approving authority shall approve or disapprove its report at a public meeting after giving the charter school 30 days’ notice. If the approving authority disapproves the report, it shall identify the reasons for that decision with particularity. Thereafter, the approving authority shall hold a hearing, within 30 days, to decide the appropriate remedy pursuant to subsection (f) of this section.

(f) If the approving authority determines that the criteria for remedial action set forth in § 516 of this title have been satisfied, it may revoke the charter and manage the school directly until alternative arrangements can be made for students at the school or place the school on a probationary status subject to terms determined by the approving authority which are directly relevant to the violation or violations.

(g) If a local school district which is an approving authority decides to revoke the school’s charter or place the school on probationary status, the applicant may file for arbitration in writing with the American Arbitration Association in Philadelphia within 20 days of the local board’s decision stating the reasons why it believes the local board decision was in error. A copy of said filing shall be provided simultaneously with the approving authority. The parties shall select an arbitrator in accordance with the American Arbitration Association’s procedure for voluntary labor disputes, provided, however, that such arbitration shall occur in this State. The arbitrator’s fees and costs shall be borne equally by the parties. The arbitrator shall convene a hearing and determine whether the local board’s decision was in error. The arbitrator shall have 30 days to render a decision following the close of the hearing. The arbitrator’s decision shall be final and binding upon the parties.

(h) If the approving authority is the Department and it decides to revoke the school’s charter or place the school on probationary status, its decision shall be final and not subject to arbitration or judicial review.

(i) Prior to any charter school closure decision, an approving authority shall have developed and shall utilize a charter school closure protocol to ensure timely notification to parents and employees, orderly transition of students and student records to new schools, and proper disposition of school funds, property, and assets in accordance with the requirements of 79 Del. Laws, c. 51 and other applicable laws. The protocol shall specify tasks, timelines, and responsible parties, including delineating the respective duties of the school and the approving authority. In the event of a charter school closure for any reason, the approving authority shall oversee and work with the closing school to ensure a smooth and orderly closure and transition for students, parents and employees, as guided by the closure protocol.

(j) In the event of a charter school closure for any reason, all cash and cash equivalents held by or available to the school shall be distributed first to satisfy outstanding payroll obligations for employees of the school, then to the remaining creditors of the school. Remaining State General Fund appropriations for that school year shall be returned to each district in an amount proportionate to the number of students received by each district. Additional remaining State General Fund appropriations shall be returned to the general revenue fund through the State Treasury. Remaining funds received from local school districts shall be returned to each of the districts in an amount proportionate to the number of students from each district. Any remaining funds and assets will be managed by the charter, as appropriate. In the event that a charter school files for bankruptcy, the distribution of all assets will be managed by the Bankruptcy Court or otherwise in accordance with bankruptcy laws. Nothing herein shall be construed in any way to impair or preempt a lien or security interest on any asset owned by a charter school or to prevent the school from paying the costs required to close or dissolve.

(k) In the event that all state and local funds due to a charter school are paid timely as required by § 509 of this title, a charter school authorized to operate in the State must by December 31 of that fiscal year maintain an available balance sufficient to pay the minimum costs necessary to provide students with the minimum annual instructional hours required by the Department of Education during the remainder of that fiscal year as reasonably projected by the charter school. Such costs include, but are not limited to, all employee compensation required to attain the minimum annual instructional hours during the remainder of that fiscal year. Such costs also include all fixed and variable nonpayroll expenditures incurred through the final month of that school year. A school’s failure to maintain sufficient available funds by December 31 of its third year of operation shall be deemed a material violation of its charter.

70 Del. Laws, c. 179, § 270 Del. Laws, c. 186, § 171 Del. Laws, c. 180, § 3173 Del. Laws, c. 164, §§ 22, 26;74 Del. Laws, c. 360, § 479 Del. Laws, c. 51, § 9.;

§ 516 Revocation criteria.

Approved charters shall be subject to revocation or probation, after the exercise of due diligence and good faith, only for the following reasons:

(1) The school, or its representatives, has committed a material fraud on the approving authority or misappropriated federal, state or local funds; or

(2) The school fails to comply with its charter or to satisfy, in its operation of the school, the criteria set forth in § 512 of this title.

70 Del. Laws, c. 179, § 2.;

§ 517 Charter transfer to different authorizer.

Transfer of a charter, and of oversight of that public charter school, from 1 authorizer to another before the expiration of the charter term shall require a petition by the public charter school or its authorizer to the new authorizer. A petition to transfer is considered a major modification and will follow the same timelines and hearing process as a major modification.

78 Del. Laws, c. 187, § 10.;

§ 518 Oversight and revocation for multiple charter holders.

For purposes of §§ 515 and 516 of this title, each charter held by a common board of directors shall be treated separately and individually.

Yeah, I know. You are surprised.  After all that Reagan said, surely I must jest? Actually no.  Today we have access to data; back then we really didn’t. We depended upon perception and that can be easily flipped with distraction.  Sort of the way the Greenville barons of Delaware have totally destroyed Mike Protack as a viable candidate…  Same thing.  Innuendo, Innuendo, and repetition…

In Carter’s defense this tactic was new, so Carter was sitting up there, like “no, I don’t have to respond to that outrageousness, everyone knows it is not true…”

Funny how things get manipulated…  But look at the Carter years on this chart… 1977 through all of 1980.

Fixed Reinvestment

Free Cash Flow

We had massive investment in our business community.  Jobs, Jobs, Jobs.  What these to charts show, is that America turned its profit from its corporations, to itself.  Investing in capital improvement at the greatest height since figures were started in 1948.  Jimmy Carter still rules the chart….  It is exactly what we lack now.

The top personal bracket was assessed at a rate of 70%…..  yet the effective Corporate Tax rate was steadily falling from its WWII high.

220px-US_Effective_Corporate_Tax_Rate_1947-2011_v2

(Footnote — Notice how the Ronald Reagan recovery of 1983-84 was created?  Increased Corporate tax rates in the Great Reagan Compromise.  Raising taxes is what made Ronald Reagan so well loved and appreciated; not cutting them.   For future reference, just remember the effective corporate rate dropped under Jimmy Carter, and ROSE under Ronald Reagan.)

Social Security was at it’s best ever.

Social Security

Pension Plans at their highest ever…

gr-retirement-trends-624

And for a closer look an employment, one can see here why and where we have lost jobs…

employment breakdown by industry

And most importantly, the era of Jimmy Carter was when the 99% owned it’s highest share of wealth, ever…

Wealth_distribution_over_time

A lot can be said for Jimmy Carter.  He got such a bad rap.  When Ronald Reagan himself was overwhelmingly RE-ELECTED in 1984,  his unemployment level was only 3 tenths of a percent under Jimmy Carter’s back on the previous election day…  If one clicks on the link above which delineates the unemployment rate month by month, ones sees that unemployment did not return to the best of Jimmy Carter’s years, until the waning months of the the Reagan term….

The only class of America that wasn’t better off in the Carter years, was the wealthy….  And that is why, just as today, we had a smear campaign to discredit the person who did the most ever, to help the middle class….

The record shows that America’s middle class peaked in 79.  Then came Reagan.

And if we were totally fair with ourselves, the reason Carter was so throughly dissed was because we were embarrassed with ourselves in the seventies… Our cities in decay, our youth on drugs, the early creative musical giants had dissolved into disco.  We didn’t really like who we were. We had to blame… someone…  After all, this look was actually cool in 1979.

What was cool in 1979

(Thank you Fullerton College)

Gee, no wonder we like Reagan so much…

1.  Increase Taxes on Top Echelon at a 60/40 split. They keep 60; they pay 40.

2.  Allow capital improvement inside the geographical USA to be written off the year it is expensed.

3. Return Federal Jobs to levels before 2008.

4. Return State jobs to levels before 2008.

5. Return Local jobs to levels before 2008.

————–

The arguments have been long expounded as to how, as to why, and as to the details of when.  I’ll save time by not repeating them. …

Every county in America would get a jump on their own unemployment immediately.

First Buffet, now Gates.  Higher rates of taxation are necessary to rectify our society, even if limited for the short term….

It is nice when those who have much money, recognize the reality.

There is a bill in the Senate to extend benefits to those long term unemployed who suddenly are without money.  Any money.

As local news agencies have oft repeatedly reported, when new jobs get offered there are over 100s, sometimes 1000s of applicants for each position..  With so many unemployed for so few jobs, how does cutting unemployment benefits to these long-termed unemployed help anyone or do anything to help the economy?  They do a lot to hurt however…  For example Delaware will have lost $3.9 million dollars of economic activity by this Saturday coming up…  That missing almost $4 million in 3 weeks means cut hours for those across the state who could be normally be working….but for this cut.

That is just one example.  Inventory restocking gets cut, as $4 million in product which would be normally gone, still sits on Delaware’s grocers’ shelves.  Those delivering and producing also must cut hours back, because from every state they serve, they are getting the same reactions.

So why, is it that something so simple cannot be passed by Congress?…. You will probably hear from America’s media that alas, it is gridlock and it is both party’s fault.  No doubt on some networks you will hear that the majority party will stubbornly not allow any amendments to this bill and for that, it is the Democrat’s fault if the bill does not have support of the minority.  Or then again, you may hear what is really happening.

The Republican minority is loading up the unemployment bill with junk amendments which it wants Democrats to have a record of voting upon when they compete in the Congressional elections in 2014, ten months away.

That is why, attached to the Long-Term Unemployment Compensation Bill, are all these amendments which……

1. S.AMDT.2603 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Ayotte, Kelly [NH] (introduced 1/7/2014) Cosponsors (14)
Latest Major Action: 1/7/2014 Senate amendment submitted

2. S.AMDT.2604 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Vitter, David [LA] (introduced 1/7/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/7/2014 Senate amendment submitted

3. S.AMDT.2605 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Inhofe, James M. [OK] (introduced 1/7/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/7/2014 Senate amendment submitted

4. S.AMDT.2606 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Coburn, Tom [OK] (introduced 1/7/2014) Cosponsors (9)
Latest Major Action: 1/7/2014 Senate amendment submitted

5. S.AMDT.2607 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor:  Sen Coburn, Tom [OK] (introduced 1/7/2014) Cosponsors (4)
Latest Major Action: 1/7/2014 Senate amendment submitted

6. S.AMDT.2608 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Blumenthal, Richard [CT] (introduced 1/7/2014) Cosponsors (2)
Latest Major Action: 1/7/2014 Senate amendment submitted

7. S.AMDT.2609 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text.
Sponsor: Sen Coats, Daniel [IN] (introduced 1/7/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/7/2014 Senate amendment submitted

8. S.AMDT.2610 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Coats, Daniel [IN] (introduced 1/7/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/7/2014 Senate amendment submitted

9. S.AMDT.2611 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Coats, Daniel [IN] (introduced 1/7/2014) Cosponsors (1)
Latest Major Action: 1/7/2014 Senate amendment submitted

10. S.AMDT.2612 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :Sponsor: Sen Moran, Jerry [KS] (introduced 1/7/2014) Cosponsors (1)
Latest Major Action: 1/7/2014 Senate amendment submitted

11. S.AMDT.2613 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :Sponsor: Sen Portman, Rob [OH] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (4)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

12. S.AMDT.2614 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :Sponsor: Sen Paul, Rand [KY] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (1)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

13. S.AMDT.2615 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text.:  Sponsor: Sen Inhofe, James M. [OK] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (4)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

14. S.AMDT.2616 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Portman, Rob [OH] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (1)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

15. S.AMDT.2617 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Coats, Daniel [IN] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

16. S.AMDT.2618 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Shaheen, Jeanne [NH] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (12)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

17. S.AMDT.2619 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Portman, Rob [OH] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

18. S.AMDT.2620 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Toomey, Pat [PA] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

19. S.AMDT.2621 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text.:   Sponsor: Sen Portman, Rob [OH] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

20. S.AMDT.2622 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Thune, John [SD] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (2)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

21. S.AMDT.2623 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text.   Sponsor: Sen McConnell, Mitch [KY] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (1)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

22. S.AMDT.2624 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen McConnell, Mitch [KY] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (1)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

23. S.AMDT.2625 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen McConnell, Mitch [KY] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (1)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

24. S.AMDT.2626 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Sessions, Jeff [AL] (introduced 1/8/2014) Cosponsors (3)
Latest Major Action: 1/8/2014 Senate amendment submitted

25. S.AMDT.2627 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text.:  Sponsor: Sen Scott, Tim [SC] (introduced 1/9/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/9/2014 Senate amendment submitted

26. S.AMDT.2628 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text.:  Sponsor: Sen Portman, Rob [OH] (introduced 1/9/2014) Cosponsors (1)
Latest Major Action: 1/9/2014 Senate amendment submitted

27. S.AMDT.2629 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text.:  Sponsor: Sen Collins, Susan M. [ME] (introduced 1/9/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/9/2014 Senate amendment submitted

28. S.AMDT.2630 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Flake, Jeff [AZ] (introduced 1/9/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/9/2014 Senate amendment submitted

29. S.AMDT.2631 to S.1845 Relating to extension and modification of emergency unemployment compensation program. :  Sponsor: Sen Reed, Jack [RI] (introduced 1/9/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/9/2014 Senate amendment proposed (on the floor)

30. S.AMDT.2632 to S.1845  To change the enactment date. :  Sponsor: Sen Reid, Harry [NV] (introduced 1/9/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/9/2014 Senate amendment proposed (on the floor)

31. S.AMDT.2633 to S.1845 To change the enactment date. :  Sponsor: Sen Reid, Harry [NV] (introduced 1/9/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/9/2014 Senate amendment proposed (on the floor)

32. S.AMDT.2634 to S.1845 Of a perfecting nature. :  Sponsor: Sen Reid, Harry [NV] (introduced 1/9/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/9/2014 Senate amendment proposed (on the floor)

33. S.AMDT.2635 to S.1845 Of a perfecting nature. :  Sponsor: Sen Reid, Harry [NV] (introduced 1/9/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/9/2014 Senate amendment proposed (on the floor)

34. S.AMDT.2636 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Pryor, Mark L. [AR] (introduced 1/9/2014) Cosponsors (None)
Latest Major Action: 1/9/2014 Senate amendment submitted

35. S.AMDT.2637 to S.1845 Purpose will be available when the amendment is proposed for consideration. See Congressional Record for text. :  Sponsor: Sen Scott, Tim [SC] (introduced 1/9/2014) Cosponsors (2)
Latest Major Action: 1/9/2014 Senate amendment submitted

So when you happen to hear from someone who is not accurately attuned to factual reality, still stating that both sides own part of the problem, politely inform them that if they want to report on the news accurately, they should properly state that 28/35ths of the delay is Republican orieneted…. (I’m being generous;  if you back out Reid’s strictly procedural amendments, the problem is even more onesided as being 28/32ths the Republican’s fault….)

Some of these amendments, especially from Republicans,  cover a wide range of topics…. Here are a few…..

REPEAL OF ALL  REDUCTIONS MADE BY BIPARTISAN BUDGET ACT
OF 2013.  Ayote’s Amendment #1

TRANSPARENCY OF CONGRESSIONAL STAFFER’S AFFORDABLE CARE ACT COVERAGE of every House and Senate Office member as well as the representatives themselves.  Vitter’s #2 Amendment.

STATE CONTROL OF ENERGY DEVELOPMENT AND PRODUCTION ON
ALL AVAILABLE FEDERAL LAND. .  Inhoffe’s #3 Amendment.

ENDING UNEMPLOYMENT PAYMENTS TO JOBLESS MILLIONAIRES
AND BILLIONAIRES. ( just the visual of Bill Gates standing in line in a Washington State’s Unemployment Office for his weekly check of $224 dollars, was worth all the time writing this article…)  Coburn #4 Amendment.

PROHIBITION ON PAYMENT OF BENEFITS BASED ON RECEIPT
OF UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION which cuts future Social Security Benefits by the amount dispensed through unemployment compensation.  Coburn #5 Amendment.

CREATE PATHWAYS BACK TO WORK FUND OF $12 BILLION.  Gives Secretary of Labor discretion to spend $12 billion to give to states who create state jobs for unemployed.  Blumenthal (D)  #6 Amendment.

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER REQUIRED TO CLAIM THE  REFUNDABLE PORTION OF THE CHILD TAX CREDIT.  Coats #7 Amendment.

DISQUALIFICATION ON RECEIPT OF DISABILITY INSURANCE  BENEFITS IN A MONTH FOR WHICH UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION IS RECEIVED. Coats #8 Amendment.

DELAY IN APPLICATION OF INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE  MANDATE.  Coats #9 Amendment

CONDITIONAL PERMANENT RESIDENT STATUS FOR ALIENS  WITH AN ADVANCED DEGREE IN A STEM FIELD.  Moran #10 Amendment

DISQUALIFICATION ON RECEIPT OF DISABILITY INSURANCE  BENEFITS IN A MONTH FOR WHICH UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION IS RECEIVED.  Portman #11 Amendment

PROHIBITION AGAINST A FEDERAL GOVERNMENT BAILOUT OF A STATE,  CITY, OR MUNICIPALITY  Rand Paul #12 Amendment

ANALYSIS OF EMPLOYMENT EFFECTS UNDER THE CLEAN AIR  ACT.  Inhoffe #13 Amendment

AUTHORITY TO USE ANY DISCRETIONARY APPROPRIATIONS  AVAILABLE TO THE SECRETARY OF LABOR TO CONDUCT IN-PERSON REEMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT  INSURANCE ELIGIBILITY ASSESSMENTS FOR  UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE BENEFICIARIES..  Portman #14 Amendment

REQUIREMENT THAT INDIVIDUALS RECEIVING EMERGENCY  UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION BE ACTIVELY ENGAGED IN A SYSTEMATIC AND SUSTAINED EFFORT TO OBTAIN EMPLOYMENT.  Coats #15 Amendment

TREATMENT OF FOREIGN CORPORATIONS MANAGED AND  CONTROLLED IN THE UNITED STATES AS DOMESTIC CORPORATIONS.  Shaheen (D) Amendment #16

READJUSTMENT OF AMENDMENT #14 ABOVE:  Portman #17 Amendment

EXTENSION AND MODIFICATION OF THE EMERGENCY  UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION PROGRAM.  Combines most Republican amendments into one amendment. Tooney #18 Amendment

UNFUNDED MANDATES ACCOUNTABILITY.  Portman #19 Amendment

EXEMPTION FROM AFFORDABLE CARE ACT MANDATE FOR LONG-TERM
UNEMPLOYED.  LONG-TERM UNEMPLOYED INDIVIDUALS NOT TAKEN INTO
ACCOUNT FOR EMPLOYER HEALTH CARE COVERAGE  MANDATE:  Thune #20 Amendment

REPEAL OF  REDUCTIONS MADE BY BIPARISAN  BUDGET ACT OF 2013. McConnell #21 Amendment

DELAY IN APPLICATION OF INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE MANDATE  McConnell #22 Amendment

REPEAL OF NONREDUCTION RULE UNDER THE EMERGENCY UNEMPLOYMENT ACT.  McConnell #23 Amendment

ACCOUNTABILITY THROUGH ELECTRONIC VERIFICATION. Sessions #24 Amendment

MODIFICATION OF DEFINITION OF FULL-TIME EMPLOYEE FROM 30 HOUR/WEEK TO 40 HOURS/WEEK. Scott #25 Amendment

STEERING FEDERAL TRAINING DOLLARS TOWARD SKILLS NEEDED BY INDUSTRY. Portman #26 Amendment

DEFINITION OF FULL-TIME EMPLOYEE Collins #27 Amendment

REDUCTION IN SHARE OF CROP INSURANCE PREMIUM PAID BY FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION. Flake #28 Amendment

REQUIREMENT FOR PARTICIPATION IN PUBLIC SERVICE AS A CONDITION FOR RECEIPT OF EXTENDED UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS  Reed #29 Amendment

LAW ENACTED ON  DAY AFTER SIGNING   Reid #30 Amendment

AMENDMENT TO PREVIOUS AMENDMENT  Reid #31 Amendment

AMENDMENT TO PREVIOUS AMENDMENT  Reid #32 Amendment

AMENDMENT TO PREVIOUS AMENDMENT. Reid #33 Amendment

REQUIREMENT FOR PARTICIPATION IN PUBLIC SERVICE AS A
CONDITION FOR RECEIPT OF EXTENDED UNEMPLOYMENT
BENEFITS.  Pryor #34 Amendment

SUPPORTING KNOWLEDGE AND INVESTING IN LIFELONG SKILLS  Scott #35 Amendment

And that is one half of the reason we do not have extended Unemployment benefits.  The other half lies in the House.

TARP Was A Brave, Noble, and Foresighfful Act

Like him or not, the TARP plan was an amazing success. At a cost of $422 billion, it paid taxpayers back $433 billion… It made money!

Remember the other side…. The one that said “let everyone fail”? Yeah… They are pretty quite now, aren’t they?  Cockroaches under a log.

At times, government needs to intervene…. anyone who says otherwise needs voted out of office….

Don’t you hate how everything is in initials today… As if one is supposed to remember what all those stand for….

Cunt Switching Imbeciles sue Damn Norquist Rectal Energizer Conglomerates over Raping Governor’s Gerbil’s Ass*oles.

Perhaps I got it wrong.  Now I have to go look-up other alternatives on the Internet and see what other possibilities could occur.  Are you sure I’m wrong? You are, huh?  Do any of them fit?

Perhaps if one didn’t use initials and came right out and said  “Caesar Rodney Institute sues  Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control over Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative”, we’d save a lot of time…  However the off-line consensus says I nailed it pretty well with the first stab of interpretation….

So what is this about?

Did you ever at work have those smart asses who try to cause trouble by challenging the interpretation of every word in the employee handbook?  Their prime objective is simply to be annoying.  For example if the handbook states that shoes must be worn, they point out that it doesn’t specifically allow for sneakers, and that under some obscure rule or regulation that only they can find, someone once said that sneakers were different from shoes….  Therefor all those wearing sneakers need to come to work in “real” shoes?  And so they force an issue that should have been left unchallenged, for of course sneakers are shoes and everyone knows that, but we have now to go through a long trial and they and the sneaker people have to appear before the arbitrator and waste everyone’s time to decide the obvious, that yes, sneakers are shoes because they protect the feet almost equally….. And therefore much time is wasted over nothing…..

Yeah, this lawsuit is like that…. Very similar to the Constitutional Sheriff’s argument that 2013 put to rest….  The formula is the same. Take an obscure colonial reference, twist it in a fashion so someone could according to that interpretation be acting illegally, bring it up and harass until it goes to trial, then appeal your loss, then appeal that new loss again….  The sole object it to waste time, and draw attention away from doing one’s assigned duties.

Of course or laws are designed so  they have the right to do that… but in balance,  we are also given right, if not duty,  to skewer them royally for all the selfishness and pomposity they exhibit…  Of course as in the work-place analogy, all the exaggeration we do makes little difference in the outcome, for as the ridicule piles on from us, they double down, enabling us to pile even more ridicule upon them…….  Our only benefit is that we get something to mock, to laugh at… And if you live this life and don’t laugh out loud every other minute, your missing out on life my friend….

One of the suitors is a legislator…. Harold “Lost-My” Peterman… a Log Cabin Republican from Milford…. Peterman

Hi. I’m Harold “Lost-My” Peterman and I approve this lawsuit.

So what does all this mean?

Essentially it means the Koch Brothers are  paying to impede Delaware’s entrance into the agreement we have over CO2 with our neighbors, because Koch-heads don’t care how people get hurt as long as they make their money….   That is essentially what this is all over….

Now here is their mixed up, convoluted,  obfuscated,  Rue Goldberg Contraptionalized, attempt to make that money grab look like something else…..

They are challenging its Constitutionality, taking a page right out of Jeff Christopher’s bid to becomes Supreme Ruler over the Fiefdom of Delaware….

They are trying to win friends by implying that environmental controls  were not put in place to protect the environment from money grabbers who just want to make money and don’t care what harm gets left behind….  but instead were put there by “bad,  bad people” who “just don’t like them”, and therefore in fairness they should just … go away…  So they can make more money.

They are also trying to scare the population by making everyone think that energy costs will rise solely because of laws to protect the environment….

Before we jump on them and bust apart their claims,  let’s cover what the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative really does…

Most of us don’t know.  In plain speak, it was a way of spreading out the costs of what we will one day have to pay…

This concept is very pertinent at a time we are all sensitive to corporate abuse of our social structure. Wal*wart and McDonalds are paying $7.25 and hour, and enjoying the fruits of that low labor cost while they send their employees off to get food stamps and Medicaid at the taxpayers expense…

We, the taxpayers are subsidizing their business…  Wal*Mart and McDonald’s should be paying for the Food Stamps and Medicaid costs out of their excessive profits….   But since they aren’t… it amounts that they are using government subsidized labor to increase their profit margins, then walking away from their self-created problem….

It is the same with energy…. Essentially we will one day have to pay for our energy’s damage to the environment.  That is a given.  The question is when…  Recognizing this, several states joined in a pool to sort of start assessing power companies some of that cost now, so it would not be a giant shock in the future.

The way it works is that in this region, power companies will have to cut down their emissions or pay a fine.  It is minimal in the first few years and gradually gets tighter over time.  The Power companies if they possibly cannot meet the requirement for a variety of reasons, can do so through credits earned by paying cash to companies who did come in under their threshold of gas emissions…. It’s like if I farted less than you,  and you farted more, you could pay me money for the times I didn’t fart…

It is an arbitrary scheme and that is why it has animosity behind it, primarily from people of “that type” who don’t like arbitrary schemes.  But the contrivance was built to create a marketplace incentive by using that biggest motivating factor ever,… money!   By playing these rules, you can make money by cutting down your greenhouse gases….

To make this lawsuit even more of a moot case, every state is already far under the allowance caps, because cheap natural gas from fracking has replace dirty coal in most furnaces….

The second myth being propelled by Koch-heads is that this will cost you, the customer, more money…  They  play on our common sense notions that if things cost more to get, the price goes up….  Well, you can readily see with energy, … that is not necessarily so….

Let’s use gasoline as an example… Right now at the pump gas is at $3.45 to $3.55 a gallon for regular.  I saw both on my return from church this Sunday.   The last time prices were that high, a barrel of oil cost $107.  It now costs $93.   Yet, when it was at $98, the pump prices were between $3.20 and $3.30….

The point being made is that energy prices, because we need them no matter what they cost, are set by demand, not supply…   Holiday Travel pushed the price up the week before Thanksgiving, and  Christmas and New Year’s pushed it up now…  Especially with fracking, acquiring energy is rather cheap.  Some wells produce at a cost of 19 cents a gallon.

So who gets hurt, is not the consumer, if costs go up…  The money makers in the middle are the sole ones who have to eat their profits.   Which is exactly why the Koch Brothers are funding this nuisance lawsuit to cast aspersions upon the Greenhouse Gas Initiative….

If  the Koch Brothers earn $3.26 cents off of every gallon sold at $3.45,  they will fight to make sure that doesn’t drop to $3.25, or $3.24, or $3.23 or lower….  People purchasing energy will not be affected by the Initiatives.  The Corporate Investors will.   Unfortunately as we can see with today’s gasoline, even when energy prices plummet, we the consumer, don’t get the benefit… The Hedge funds do…

So the bottom line is this….  The Greenhouse Gas Initiative save us money… They put the cost of the problem upon those who are creating the problem, and not leaving it for us to pay from some other account at some future date…  Corporate profits in the energy business are too high, and have been since deregulation.    Those who are making money off of polluting the world, off of blowing CO2 into the air,  should be able to make money and pay for the polluting of the world… The Koch Brother think differently, and that is why they are paying for this lawsuit…

It is ironical that a Delaware legislator from Milford, which does not have a huge power plant in their backyard as to those poor souls at Millsboro,…. would sell his soul and the souls of his constituents, just for some Koch Campaign money come his next election…..

Bottom line, is if the Brandywine Zoo put baboons in a glass enclosed Monkey House, and then suddenly no one came into see them, ever,  they  craving attention, would probably file a law suit just exactly like this one….