Michele Bachmann essentially gave college students a Conservative 101 on the economy, national and foreign affairs and other important issues on Thursday in Iowa at Drake University.

Throughout her comments, Bachmann tailored her delivery seemingly to suit her young audience. “How many of you, this will be your very first presidential election to vote in? Let me see your hands,” the candidate asked, receiving several raised arms from the students.

“We just heard that some of the (upcoming manditory) cuts would mean the military, which just took $400 billion in cuts, would take another $600 billion in cuts,” Bachmann said. “The current Defense Secretary [Leon] Panetta said that would be like taking a bullet to the head.”

When Bachmann opened the session to questions, some students asked relatively tame questions on what the U.S. position on Syria should be and where Bachmann stood on campaign finance reform. Some others pounced.

“You used the line of ‘bullet to the head’ for the American military,” one student said. “Part of the super committee, is that there would be mandatory cuts on either side – on entitlement programs and the military spending aspect of it. I would classify it as a bullet to the American family’s head if our entitlement programs in this country were cut drastically,” the student added. “For the people who depend on that – that are in an unemployed situation where they need federal aid, they’re the most vulnerable.”

Bachmann responded by reiterating that the nation is spending too much.

Another student asked: “You said that you wanted to increase offshore drilling and just drilling in general for oil. So that you could decrease the price of oil in the near future. Don’t you think that would kind of just be beating a dead horse instead of trying to find a reasonable solution for the long term?”

Bachmann reiterated her stance that the U.S. has tremendous energy resources, “But the problem is, even our own Department of Energy, won’t let us access them.”

Another student questioned Bachmann on national service programs, such as AmeriCorps: “You’ve gone on record as opposing those. So just wondering, if elected president, you might make that a part of your agenda? And if you think it’s a good idea, during this economy, to take away opportunities for young people to serve their country?”

“Well it isn’t the idea of young people not serving their country,” Bachmann said. “The point is, we’re broke. I don’t know if you all have gotten that message yet from me this morning,” Bachmann said.

As she criticized specifics of the nation’s health care law, one student shouted: “So screw the sick and homeless?”

“Who said that?” Bachmann asked.

“You have,” the student said.

“You could not be further from the truth,” Bachmann shot back. “You’re looking at someone who lived below poverty. Have you ever lived at that?”

Bachmann continued: “I know what I had to do. I got a job. That’s what you need to do. You need to figure out how to get a job and make your way.”

Bet when she was working the unemployment wasn’t a whopping 25-30% for recent college graduates?

Republican philosophy cannot take pressure from real facts and real life situations. It caves instantly.

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